Author Topic: 1912 question  (Read 5682 times)

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Offline divine_grace

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1912 question
« on: July 03, 2005, 08:20:41 PM »
I was reading Charlotte Zeepvat's book "The camera and the tsars". On page 141 the author wrote that during the Borodino celebrations, the Tsesarevitch was able to perform his first independent public engagement.

My question is this, what was this first public engagement about and was he doing his imperial duty by himself without his parents? Are there any pictures of it. If anyone knows please kindly response to my question. Thank you in advance. :)
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Offline Georgiy

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Re: 1912 question
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2005, 08:35:43 PM »
1912 was the centenary of the defeat of Napoleon.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Georgiy »

Offline divine_grace

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Re: 1912 question
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2005, 08:41:04 PM »
Thank you Georgiy but all of these imperial celebrations involved and was pictured with the whole imperial family as in the tsar,tsarina,tsesarevich and tsarevnas. But the author wrote there was a particular one which in a way a first by the tsesarevich. I kind of doubt it because he was so young to be by himself although there are others with him. I'm just curious. Thanks. ;)
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Offline Forum Admin

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Re: 1912 question
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2005, 10:23:57 AM »
Spiridovich goes into great detail about the Borodino celebrations in 1912, both at Borodino and in Moscow. He does not mention the Tsarevich doing anything like that at all.  Now, on the field at Borodino all of the Grand Dukes commanded their own Regiments on horseback for the great parade, and perhaps Alexei similarly rode in command of his Regiment for the first time.  I would have thought that such a significant event would have been mentioned, but it looks like that is the only possibility. I'll keep looking.

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Offline divine_grace

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Re: 1912 question
« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2005, 10:39:08 AM »
 :)Thank you for your reply Forum Administrator. I checked the notes section of the book and it didn't say where the author got her source for it. That would have been nice if the tsesarevich was riding a horse, commanding his regiment. But since he has hemophilia, wouldn't be that a daring thing the tsar and tsarina took? And you're right there should have been pictures of it that surely would have been published by now. Will be waiting for you reply. :)
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Lizameridox

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Re: 1912 question
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2005, 11:59:06 AM »
Hi, divine_grace!  I smile at the thought of the little Tsarevich Alexei taking a major part in official events at the tender age of eight.  There is a picture in the book 'Tsesarevich' (Vagrius, 1998; page 84) of the boy receiving something in a fancy wooden case from a girl in costume, as his parents, sisters and Count Fredericks look on.  He is very attentive to the young lady as she makes her presentation, as the expression on his face shows.   The picture dates from the Borodino centenary observances.

Was this one of the pictures you saw in Ms. Zeepvat's book?  I, unfortunately, do not own a copy.

I suspect Ms. Zeepvat may have gotten her information from another book I wish I owned, Le Tsarevitch: Enfant Martyr by Eugenie deGrece, from which she got a few of the anecdotes she shared in her excellent Romanov Autumn
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Lizameridox »

Offline etonexile

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Re: 1912 question
« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2005, 12:27:23 PM »
Did Alexei make some sort of speech?...Dead scary for most 8 year olds that....

Offline divine_grace

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Re: 1912 question
« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2005, 04:05:37 PM »
 :o :DHello Greshniya!! Thank you for your response and it was nice to learn something new today. I didn't know about the story of that event. I haven't seen or read both the book you described. I called the library and they don't have those particular copies. I would love to see that picture. ::) In a way it is his first independent engagement (in the act itself) Thank you so much but am sad that there are books out there that I haven't read yet. (Sigh) It's my dream to go to Russia, particularly St. Petersburg and I hope to see GARF.  :)
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Offline divine_grace

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Re: 1912 question
« Reply #8 on: July 04, 2005, 04:09:18 PM »
I'm sorry I forgot to answer your question Greshniya (got caught up in the moment). About your question= no there wasn't a picture of Alexei of that particular event. The picture of Alexei on that particular was the highly published picture of him being carried by a cossack during the 1913 parade in Moscow. Thanks.
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Offline Daniel Briere

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Re: 1912 question
« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2005, 10:01:21 PM »
I too doubt very much the Tsarevich would have been allowed to ride a horse at parades. But he did participate at them with his father. For instance, the year before, in 1911, both reviewed the Moskovsky Guards Infantry Regiment, on foot,  for its jubilee. The regiment had the Tsarevich as its colonel-in-chief. Both father and son can be seen reviewing the regiment in a newsreel which can be seen on the National Geographic tape “Russia’s last Tsar”. Unfortunately, the proud colonel-in-chief wasn’t allowed to drink the health of his regiment as his father can be seen doing so while Alexis is standing next to him, no doubt wishing he would be allowed to have a drink too!

As for the Tsarevich’s first independent engagement at Borodino, I haven’t found anything about it either. Nicholas II’s diary and detailed letters to his mother describing the events might provide the answer. Unfortunately I only have a few excerpts. Princess Eugénie’s book doesn’t mention anything special except a funny anecdote about Alexis when the IF stopped at Smolensk on their way back: he managed to approach the buffet at the House of the Nobility and drink some champagne without anyone noticing. He became quite talkative, made jokes, laugh aloud and had a marvelous time with the ladies! His parents only found out the reason why he had suddenly lost his shyness when they were back on the train: still giggling, Alexis told them of his conversations with the ladies of Smolensk and said he could hear his stomach rumble while talking to them. I guess the “colonel-in-chief” had finally got his revenge for the year before!
Daniel Briere