Author Topic: Anne Boleyn  (Read 280579 times)

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Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: Anne Boleyn
« Reply #255 on: March 27, 2009, 02:21:48 PM »
What interests me is that Mary married Henry Carey before becoming Henry VIII's mistress (unlike, for example, Bessie Blount, who was 'married off' to the obliging Gilbert Tailboys after her affair with Henry had run its course). I wonder if there’s any record of Mary becoming pregnant after marrying Carey, but before her affair with the King. If not, the fact that she was married to him for 5 years without conceiving, but upon becoming Henry’s mistress became pregnant the following year would seem to indicate that Henry Carey was indeed the king’s son. This doesn’t necessarily follow with Catherine, and of course it’s quite possible that Mary did conceive with Carey before her association with the king, but it wasn’t remarked upon because she didn’t achieve “fame” till her affair with the king.
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Offline Mari

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Re: Anne Boleyn
« Reply #256 on: March 28, 2009, 01:34:20 AM »
This link I gave was more interesting then the time line and goes into the question of "Was the Child Henry VIII's?"   

This is really interesting: http://www.palmspringsbum.org/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I7427&tree=Legends
includes Paintings
 
Mary matured into a fair, blue-eyed blonde with the legendary Howard good looks. Despite the restrictions the French Queen imposed on her entourage, Mary displayed an easy going personality. She was light-hearted yet spirited, without the calculation and cattiness that such sophisticated courts could breed. She was, according to one account, sweet, fresh and winning. About this time she caught the eye of the French King, whose ungallant sobriquet for Mary in later years was "my English mare."

Mary's final years at François' Court were no doubt thrilling. In 1517 François, triumphant from his victory at Milan, returned stuffed with ideas and breathing the rich air of the Italian Renaissance. His most treasured booty included the 65-year-old genius Leonardo da Vinci, whose works Mary must have known, whether or not she knew the Master himself. Then, too, the importance and influence of women were enhanced by the heady atmosphere of the French Renaissance as power glittered from François' mother and sister. Mary's sister, Anne, had earlier joined her in France, and in 1519 her father became French Ambassador and was frequently on the fringes of Mary's risqué life. That same year saw improved relations between the French and the English as delegations of nobles were exchanged between the two courts.

Mary's stay in France ended with the grandiose spectacle of The Field of the Cloth of Gold, held on a non-descript plain in Picardy in June 1520. Since she returned to London with the English contingent, it seems probable that she was among the 5,172 English visitors to this opulent three-week-long entente cordiale between the Houses of Valois and Tudor. By tradition, Mary and Anne Boleyn were first presented to Henry VIII at the Field of the Cloth of Gold. Although the meeting was a political fiasco with nothing accomplished, for Thomas Bullen it proved a victory: The English sovereign had noticed Mary.

Now another man entered the 16-year-old Mary's life. He was the ultimate master, King Henry VIII himself. Busy in France, Thomas Bullen could not even attend Mary's wedding to a courtier named William Carey, which took place almost immediately upon her return to England. The King gave Carey some sources of revenue and an insignificant office in his Household which would allow the newly wedded couple to live at Court. In this way began Mary Bullen, Lady Carey's six-year liaison with the King that her father had served so assiduously.

Mary followed several other women into royal favour, but only one, Elizabeth Blount, who had borne the King his only living son in 1519, had made much impact. Like Queen Claude of France, Queen Catherine of Aragon had learned to tolerate "the situation". Yet, for Mary to continue a relationship with the King for such a lengthy period indicates that she had an attractive and alluring personality as well as physical beauty. Even in 1524 when Mary bore her first child, and later a second (an indiscretion which usually prompted the King to look elsewhere) their relationship was not severely impaired.

Henry Carey, 1º Baron HunsdonDespite the toll of time and pregnancies, Mary's attraction did not diminish, evidenced by her father's rapid rise in the realm. In 1522 Thomas Bullen fell heir to the goods of the executed Duke of Buckingham and became Treasurer of the Household; Ambassador to Spain (1522-1523); Knight of the Garter (1523); and Clerk of the King's Jewels (1524). Numerous stewardships and other sinecures swelled his purse, and in June 1525 he was elevated to peerage as Viscount Rochford. Although Anne was called back to England from the French court in 1522, she spent much time at Hever and on the Continent at the Court of Margaret of Austria, as had her sister before her. Contrary to the popular romantic beliefs about Anne's immediate influence over the King, it was probably his affair with Mary from which the early bounty flowed to the Bullen family.

Mary's eldest child, a son, remains an enigma. The birth of a male to an acknowledged mistress of the King could have created a scandal, but in this case there was none. It was not until Mary's son served his cousin Elizabeth I that he greatly impressed his sovereign and his nation. The King evidently chose not to believe he had fathered the child, although the baby was conceived during his relationship with Mary and was christened Henry in his honour. The King did, however, meticulously provide for Mary's son after her husband's death. The birth of Mary's second child, Catherine, seemed to cause hardly a ripple at the Court.

At what point the King transferred his affections from Mary to her sister Anne is uncertain, although by 1527 his passions had definitely transferred to Anne. After this period Mary became an embarrassment to her sister, her father and her King.

Rochfort Manor, residence of Mary Boleyn.When Mary's husband, William, died of the sweating sickness on 22 July 1528, worse was yet to come. No longer useful to her father, a constant reminder to her sister who knew enough to avoid the King's bed for the present, out of favour with her King and newly widowed, Mary faced bitter poverty in the midst of the opulent Court. The King gave away all the deceased William Carey's sources of income. Custody of Mary's son went to Anne who was to oversee the boy's upbringing during his minority. Young Henry Carey was to be raised at a religious house instead of at Court, and his mother would not even be able to see him.

After these initial blows Mary's situation seemed to improve slightly. She became Lady Mary Rochford when all the Boleyns were given honours as King Henry bestowed ever more preferments in an effort to placate the nervous Anne while he plodded towards divorce. Eventually Mary was given a small yearly allowance by Thomas Boleyn after Anne pleaded with the King that her father ought to help support her destitute sister. After Catherine of Aragon was displaced, Mary became one of Anne's companions at an annual income of £100. And she was chosen to travel to France in Anne's entourage on a visit to Francois I in 1532, shortly before Anne became Queen
Anne Boleyn
« Last Edit: March 28, 2009, 01:57:15 AM by Mari »

Offline Mari

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Re: Anne Boleyn
« Reply #257 on: March 28, 2009, 01:55:47 AM »
By the time Mary went to comfort the distraught Anne at the birth of the stillborn son in early 1536, Mary had been secretly married for two years to Sir William Stafford, a young gentleman usher with little money and no rank. The marriage was not discovered until months later when Anne learned that Mary was pregnant again. Anne greeted the news with hysteria. Mary's relatives, the Bullens and Norfolks, disowned her. Mary Boleyn had dared to marry for love and to a socially unworthy man of her own choosing. Worse, she was already with child when one was urgently needed elsewhere. Mary and William Stafford were banished from Court in disgrace.

Only Thomas Cromwell, Henry VIII's chief minister from 1533 to 1540, kept communication lines open between the Court and the newly independent Mary. She wrote Cromwell a letter explaining that the world set little store by her, but that her beloved William Stafford cared for her a great deal. She desired only to live a simple honest life with the man she loved, she wrote, although, "...well might I have had a greater man of birth and a higher, but I ensure you I could never a had one that should a loved me so well, nor a more honest man. I had rather beg my bread with him than be the greatest Queen christened ... and I believe verily he would not forsake me to be a king."

Thomas Cromwell, c. 1532Anne's anger at thinking Mary such a fool as to wed Stafford soon abated as her own plight became increasingly serious. Anne feared she could never bear the male heir which she knew would be the best ensurance for the preservations of her marriage, no matter how far the King wandered. In 1536 Henry had his Queen arrested at a tournament at Greenwich and sent to the Tower, charged with adultery and treason. Mary's brother George was also incarcerated on a charge of incest with the Queen.

Mary's insignificant marriage and the comparative privacy of her banishment from Court protected her from the dire and probably trumped-up charges facing her brother and sister, but her liaison with the King gave her importance during Anne's trial. The King's long relationship with Mary placed him in an ironical position. He had used the law to prove that his marriage to his brother Arthur's widow was invalid. "Impediments of affinity in the first degree collateral" had been the argument Henry's advocates put forward to speed his divorce from Catherine so he could marry Anne. Further, Leviticus stated: "Thou shalt not take the sister of thy wife as a concubine," which the King had clearly done when switching his attentions from Mary to Anne. But he plunged ahead with Anne's trial by decreeing that brothers' wives fell under Divine Law while mistresses' sisters did not. Still, because his long relationship with Mary worried him, he had his marriage to Anne annulled rather than simply becoming a widower on her execution.

Elizabeth I of England, niece of Mary Boleyn.The rest of the tragedy of Mary's family is well known. Anne and George were declared guilty and beheaded in May 1536. Of Thomas Bullen's once promising brood of children, Mary alone survived. On the deaths of her siblings and the ruin of her father, who retired a broken man to Hever, Mary Boleyn, Lady Stafford, steps offstage. It is known that in 1538 after the deaths of her parents, Hever Castle was "sold" to the King by Mary's uncle, Sir James Bullen, in what was a very unusual business transaction. By law the property would have automatically reverted to the Crown. From the sale the Patent Rolls record a sum paid to Mary Stafford. The King's reason for this gift of money is as unrecorded as the rest of Mary's years after the fall of the Boleyns.

Mary Boleyn's real legacy to her nation was through her children's services to her niece, Queen Elizabeth I. Catherine Carey became gentlewoman of the Privy Chamber at Elizabeth's accession, married Sir Francis Knollys, and became the grandmother of Lord Essex, the Queen's favourite in her later years. Henry Carey, 1st Lord of Hunsdon, served as trusted advisor and put down the Catholic Dacre rebellion against his royal cousin in February 1570. On that occasion the Queen wrote Henry Carey a touching letter of which his mother Mary Boleyn would have been proud: "I doubt much, my Harry, whether that the victory were given me, more joyed me, or that you were by God appointed the instrument of my glory; and I assure you that for my country's good, the first might suffice, but for my heart's contention the second pleased me ... you have done much for honour ... You loving kinswoman, Elizabeth R."

There had been other victories and joys, heart's contentions and honours, but interwoven with these had been greed, loneliness, cruelty and heartbreak. These intriguingly brief glimpses of Mary Boleyn, whose life touched so many important figures in the Tudor panorama, show her to have been a fascinating woman.

This article was written by Karen Harper for British Heritage magazine.

On the age as who was the older:

There has always been a certain amount of confusion between the Boleyn sisters at this period of their lives, and doubt over their dates of birth. Suggested birth dates for Anne vary between 150l and 1507, and although it is most likely that Mary was the elder of the two, there may have been no more than twelve months between them.

Hever Castle, childhood home of Mary and Anne BoleynAll we really know for sure is that both girls spent some part of their early years abroad. By 1512 their father was undertaking diplomatic missions to Europe and used his official connections to get the extra advantage of a Continental 'finish' for his daughters.

One of them, now generally thought to be Anne, lived for a time in the household of Margaret, Archduchess of Austria and Regent of the Netherlands, and in 1514 Mary Boleyn went over to France in the train of Henry VIII's sister (Mary) when the latter was briefly married to old Louis XII. Again information is scanty, but it is known that Anne presently joined Mary at the French court, entering the service of Queen Claude, wife of the new king Francois I.

Sources:
# [S109] Royal Genealogy, Brian Tompset, (Hull, England: University of Hull, 7 Mar 2005), http://www3.dcs.hull.ac.uk/cgi-bin/gedlkup/n=royal?royal02339 (Reliability: 4).

# [S52] Tudor Place, Jorge H. Castelli, Mary Boleyn (Reliability: 3).

# [S316] HistoryNet, HistoryNet.com, (Leesburg, Virginia: The Weider Hisrtory Group, 2008), Mary Boleyn by Karen Harper (Reliability: 3).

# [S110] Leo's Genealogics Website, Leonardus Franciscus Maria van de Pas, (Perth, Australia: www.genealogics.org, 1990-2008).

# [S318] BBC history, British Broadcasting Corporation, (London, United Kingdom: www.bbc.co.uk, 2008), The Other Boleyn Girl (Reliability: 3).
by Alison Plowden, 27 Mar 03

# [S109] Royal Genealogy, Brian Tompset, (Hull, England: University of Hull, 7 Mar 2005).

# [S109] Royal Genealogy, Brian Tompset, (Hull, England: University of Hull, 7 Mar 2005), http://www3.dcs.hull.ac.uk/cgi-bin/gedlkup/n=royal?royal02340 (Reliability: 4).



Offline Royal Bulgaria

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Re: Anne Boleyn
« Reply #258 on: March 28, 2009, 04:55:34 AM »
WOOOW wholeeee novel.......Very very interesting information....Thank you  ::)
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Offline Yelena Aleksandrovna

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Re: Anne Boleyn
« Reply #259 on: May 04, 2009, 07:43:05 PM »
Anne Boleyn and Henry VIII


Offline Imperial_Grounds

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Re: Anne Boleyn
« Reply #260 on: June 01, 2009, 03:21:39 PM »
Wonderful one,

Now Anne is highly popular and the media again thanks to 'The Tudors' and always she is portrayed as a woman trying to catch the king's attention, which is correct, and then portayals get all too different - from a scheming woman to a person who just got catched in the moment of history. Nevertheless Anne's legacy is far more greater than just being culturaly 'exploited', she gave England a new Church, she gave England one of it's most famous and succesful Queens and her life will always be remembered for she was the one who changed England by her wish to reform. Also it is ironical that Anne was hated during her own lifetime, because of Queen Catherine of Aragon and her popularity among the people, but that after her death she became a martyr and highly popular thanks to books, movies, even an opera and television portrayals.

Either you hate or you like her.
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Offline Yelena Aleksandrovna

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Re: Anne Boleyn
« Reply #261 on: June 01, 2009, 07:15:12 PM »
I hope that no one has posted it before, if no, excuse me :-)



Other....


Offline Yelena Aleksandrovna

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Re: Anne Boleyn
« Reply #262 on: June 01, 2009, 07:17:24 PM »
Paper doll of Anne


Offline Olga Maria

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Re: Anne Boleyn
« Reply #263 on: June 26, 2009, 02:13:57 AM »




Anne
Anne
Anne
Anne
Anne

Paintings can testify how pretty she really looked like. How much more if we see true pics of herself?
« Last Edit: June 26, 2009, 02:17:57 AM by Grand Princess Shandroise »

Amazing colored fotos  by the most wonderful Yelena Aleksandrovna. Endless thank you very much!

Offline Royal Bulgaria

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Re: Anne Boleyn
« Reply #264 on: June 26, 2009, 08:42:36 AM »




Anne
Anne
Anne
Anne
Anne

Paintings can testify how pretty she really looked like. How much more if we see true pics of herself?


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Offline Olga Maria

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Re: Anne Boleyn
« Reply #265 on: June 27, 2009, 05:46:52 AM »

Amazing colored fotos  by the most wonderful Yelena Aleksandrovna. Endless thank you very much!

Offline Royal Bulgaria

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Re: Anne Boleyn
« Reply #266 on: June 27, 2009, 06:05:31 AM »
Now they work...Ihaa...
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Offline Kimberly

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Re: Anne Boleyn
« Reply #267 on: June 27, 2009, 07:05:49 AM »
Thanks for these images....I find them most peculiar
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Offline Olga Maria

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Re: Anne Boleyn
« Reply #268 on: June 29, 2009, 12:46:01 AM »


You're both very much welcome!

Amazing colored fotos  by the most wonderful Yelena Aleksandrovna. Endless thank you very much!

Offline Royal Bulgaria

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Re: Anne Boleyn
« Reply #269 on: June 29, 2009, 02:57:28 AM »
Once again those last are so rare and beautiful...
Fear knocked at the door. Faith answered. No one was there.