Author Topic: King Louis XIV  (Read 70776 times)

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Offline Marc

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Re: King Louis XIV
« Reply #60 on: December 11, 2005, 07:13:58 AM »
From what I read in King Louis XIV biography,the real identity of the man in the Iron Mask was only known to King Louis XIV,King Louis XV,King Louis XVI and previously Prince Regent d'Orleans(King Louis XIV told him on his death-bed)!

Offline RomanovFan

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Re: King Louis XIV
« Reply #61 on: December 26, 2005, 01:19:21 AM »
Did those kings know who the prisoner in the mask was? Was he actually supposed to be the good twin brother of a nasty king?
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Offline ilyala

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Re: King Louis XIV
« Reply #62 on: December 26, 2005, 03:24:52 AM »
maybe the other way around ;D
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Offline bell_the_cat

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Re: King Louis XIV
« Reply #63 on: December 26, 2005, 05:38:01 AM »
Some say the man was the Duke of Monmouth! James II didn't have the heart to have his nephew executed, so he had another man beheaded in his place and sent Monmouth to Louis XIV.....
Never put off until tomorrow what you can put off until the day after tomorrow. (Mark Twain)

palatine

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Re: King Louis XIV
« Reply #64 on: December 28, 2005, 01:04:02 PM »
Monmouth was executed in front of a large crowd of witnesses, so he couldn't have been the man in the iron mask.

Offline bell_the_cat

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Re: King Louis XIV
« Reply #65 on: January 02, 2006, 05:19:56 AM »
This is what Mme Campan says in her memoirs:

"During the first few months of his reign Louis XVI. dwelt at La Muette, Marly, and Compiegne. When settled at Versailles he occupied himself with a general examination of his grandfather's papers. He had promised the Queen to communicate to her all that he might discover relative to the history of the man with the iron mask, who, he thought, had become so inexhaustible a source of conjecture only in consequence of the interest which the pen of a celebrated writer had excited respecting the detention of a prisoner of State, who was merely a man of whimsical tastes and habits.

I was with the Queen when the King, having finished his researches, informed her that he had not found anything among the secret papers elucidating the existence of this prisoner; that he had conversed on the matter with M. de Maurepas, whose age made him contemporary with the epoch during which the story must have been known to the ministers; and that M. de Maurepas had assured him he was merely a prisoner of a very dangerous character, in consequence of his disposition for intrigue. He was a subject of the Duke of Mantua, and was enticed to the frontier, arrested there, and kept prisoner, first at Pignerol, and afterwards in the Bastille. This transfer took place in consequence of the appointment of the governor of the former place to the government of the latter. It was for fear the prisoner should profit by the inexperience of a new governor that he was sent with the Governor of Pignerol to the Bastille.

Such was, in fact, the truth about the man on whom people have been pleased to fix an iron mask. And thus was it related in writing, and published by M. ——- twenty years ago. He had searched the archives of the Foreign Office, and laid the real story before the public; but the public, prepossessed in favour of a marvellous version, would not acknowledge the authenticity of his account. Every man relied upon the authority of Voltaire; and it was believed that a natural or a twin brother of Louis XIV. lived many years in prison with a mask over his face. The story of this mask, perhaps, had its origin in the old custom, among both men and women in Italy, of wearing a velvet mask when they exposed themselves to the sun. It is possible that the Italian captive may have sometimes shown himself upon the terrace of his prison with his face thus covered. As to the silver plate which this celebrated prisoner is said to have thrown from his window, it is known that such a circumstance did happen, but it happened at Valzin, in the time of Cardinal Richelieu. This anecdote has been mixed up with the inventions respecting the Piedmontese prisoner."
Never put off until tomorrow what you can put off until the day after tomorrow. (Mark Twain)

Offline Mili

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Re: King Louis XIV
« Reply #66 on: January 25, 2006, 08:36:10 PM »
My God! These photos are absolutely and spectacularly breath-taking. I'll get there one day :)
The Trianon is actually quite more modern to what i expected, and it surely is different from the Austrian court and imperial apartments! It wasn't quite furnished according to the French court standards was it?
Marie Antoinette's bed looks exceedingly uncomfortable; it gives me the impression of being covered in clingwrap!
Also what were the wc's like in palaces before the 19th century? Were chamber pots relied on mostly?

Offline bell_the_cat

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Re: King Louis XIV
« Reply #67 on: January 26, 2006, 01:31:09 AM »
Quote
My God! These photos are absolutely and spectacularly breath-taking. I'll get there one day :)
The Trianon is actually quite more modern to what i expected, and it surely is different from the Austrian court and imperial apartments! It wasn't quite furnished according to the French court standards was it?
Marie Antoinette's bed looks exceedingly uncomfortable; it gives me the impression of being covered in clingwrap!
Also what were the wc's like in palaces before the 19th century? Were chamber pots relied on mostly?


The nobility had what was called a chaise percée. It was like a normal (very ornate) chair with a hole in it. Underneath would be the chamber pot which would be removed by a servant. Ladies had little stools - a servant would crawl under their voluminious skirts to put them into place!

Everyone else used the corridors I believe.  :) Well, you did ask!
Never put off until tomorrow what you can put off until the day after tomorrow. (Mark Twain)

Offline ilyala

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Re: King Louis XIV
« Reply #68 on: January 26, 2006, 03:10:17 AM »
Quote

The nobility had what was called a chaise percée. It was like a normal (very ornate) chair with a hole in it. Underneath would be the chamber pot which would be removed by a servant. Ladies had little stools - a servant would crawl under their voluminious skirts to put them into place!

Everyone else used the corridors I believe.  :) Well, you did ask!



talk about nasty jobs :D
'loving might be a mistake, but it's worth making'
ilya


Offline Mili

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Re: King Louis XIV
« Reply #69 on: January 26, 2006, 04:38:21 AM »
The corridors  :o :o :o

Offline elena_maria_vidal

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Re: King Louis XIV
« Reply #70 on: January 26, 2006, 08:06:48 AM »
That is very true. The corridors and especially the stairwells reeked. That is why those who could escaped the main palace to their "country" houses.


Offline Angie_H

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Re: King Louis XIV
« Reply #71 on: January 26, 2006, 12:00:43 PM »
I read somewhere that the man was Louis XIV "real" father. That another man was his father and not Louis XIII and because he so resembled Louis XIV he had to wear the mask. Probably a bunch of bunk but look at Louis XIII & Anne of Austria, after 20 yrs. of marriage they finally have a child?

Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: King Louis XIV
« Reply #72 on: January 26, 2006, 12:02:09 PM »
Umigon knows a lot about that issue. I think it's historically almost 100% proven that Anne and Louis were Louis XIV's parents . . .
"How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?"
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palatine

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Re: King Louis XIV
« Reply #73 on: January 26, 2006, 02:26:58 PM »
Most historians are convinced that Louis XIII was the father of Louis XIV and Philippe.

Some believe that after Louis XIII died, Anne of Austria secretly married Cardinal Mazarin.  If they'd had a child or children, it would have been politically embarrassing for everyone.  There is no proof of Anne and Mazarin's marriage, or that they had a child together, but at one time it was a leading theory to explain the true identity of the Man in the Iron Mask.

Offline Sissi

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Re: King Louis XIV
« Reply #74 on: January 26, 2006, 03:06:37 PM »
I did not know that Louis XVIII asked MT if she new that identity of the man in the iron mask!!!! :o


 I learn from you guys everyday thanks!!!! ;)

Alexandre Dumas in his novels "Le Comte de Bragelonne" deals a lot with the man in the iron mask, according to the novel, Aramis new that the prisoner was Louis XIV twin brother. he tries a coup d etat by replacing the king by the prisoner but d Artagnan finds out and avoids it.

  Alexandre Dumas and many other writers such as Voltaire who you guys mentioned before did beleive that the prisoner was of royal blood.

 I guess we will never know, but I just think we love mysteries, and this is probably one of the biggest ever!

 Anyways, he must have been pretty famous, and pretty dangerous....