Author Topic: Grand Duke Konstantin (KR) and his family- discussion and pictures, Part I  (Read 246876 times)

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Offline Svetabel

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Who haves the Motsarvo (sic) book about GD Konstantin K. and give some direct link to website to buy it?



You mean the Motsardo book I believe. It's out of print.

Offline Teddy

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Thats a pity. Do you know if a reprint is expected?

Offline Svetabel

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Thats a pity. Do you know if a reprint is expected?

Seems a reprint is not expected  :(

Offline Svetabel

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Princess Vera Konstantinovna in a Russian folk costume ( in the 1920s).



Princess Vera with a portrait of her father at back


Offline Svetabel

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3 sons of GD KR in September 1914.

From left to right : Oleg, Ioann, Igor



In the bottom of the picture is a signature of GD KR - "Our three hussars".

I guess this is the last photo of Prince Oleg as he was killed in the end of September 1914.  :(

Offline Miguelemejia

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Thanks Svetabel for the photos of Princess Vera Konstantinovna. The catalog of the exhibit held recently in Russia about her life is available at the New York Public Library Slavic department. Its a wonderful book with not only great pictures but seems to have a great deal information about her life unfortunately I don't speak Russian.
I wonder what she did with her life, did she have an occupation, what brought her to the United States. What kind of person was she?
The book might answer to those questions that I can only wonder.

Eric_Lowe

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Too bad nobody made a book of her life...especially she lived most of it in USA... ???

Offline grandduchessella

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Maybe there isn't enough for a whole book. Just because someone is royal or born to a fascinating family doesn't make their own life intrinsically book-worthy. Her life in the United States, for all its length, was fairly uneventful and quiet. There was a decent amount in the book on her family, Gilded Prism.

'Thus began [the escape from Russia] a nomadic existence, moving to Belgium before finally settling in her mother's native Germany, where she lived through the difficult years' of WW2....'For many years, as she later admitted, she was haunted by the 'monstrous' events of the Revolution. 'For many years,' she recalled, 'I used to have the same dream, as if I stood with my back to a pit and they were going to shoot me...my awakening was not less terrible than the dream itself, because I was constantly afraid to open my eyes and see that they had really come to take me to the execution.' After WW2, fleeing the Soviets, she 'faced the harsh truth that she belonged to no country' as she only had an ambiguous Nansen passport which gave her the ability to travel but no protections of statehood. Despite this, she refused to take the protection offered to her by various European countries, feeling herself Russian. She moved to the US in 1951 and lived in New York where she was very active in charities but regarded some of the emigree community, and some of their pretensions, with skepticism. She didn't have the 'nostalgic idyll' of many emigrees but rather the memories of her childhood and her lost family. The 'constant stream' of visitors she regarded with some amusement and also found it rather 'trying'. She didn't care for those who would 'speak in awe-struck tones' of the late Imperial family--she would often relate stories of their humanness and misbehavior. For her they remained her 'childhood playmates, not distant figures for adoration'. She also regarded the canonization of the Romanovs, including her brothers and uncle, as a 'puzzling, pecular' move by the Church.
« Last Edit: June 27, 2007, 09:35:08 PM by grandduchessella »
They also serve who only stand and wait--John Milton
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Eric_Lowe

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An autobio would have been nice... :P

Offline Svetabel

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An autobio would have been nice... :P

Princess Vera did write 4 short articles about her life for a magazine "Kadetskaya pereklichka" published by Union of the Russian Kadets (in New-York). One of these articles is in the recent catalogue on her --just a general info, she doesn't go into details of her private life or private life of her relatives. Also she doesn't explain why she moved to the USA.

Offline grandduchessella

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An autobio would have been nice... :P

Princess Vera did write 4 short articles about her life for a magazine "Kadetskaya pereklichka" published by Union of the Russian Kadets (in New-York). One of these articles is in the recent catalogue on her --just a general info, she doesn't go into details of her private life or private life of her relatives. Also she doesn't explain why she moved to the USA.

Her brother George had lived in the US until his death and he was buried there--maybe it seemed as good a place as any since she was rootless at this pint. Perhaps it was just the matter of a fresh start--since the revolution she had mostly lived in Germany (roughly 1922 until 1945 except for 2 years living in London) but Germany was in ruins and her home in Altenburg (her mother's native country) was in the Soviet sector. Given her terror of the Soviets, as recounted in her nightmare, she may have just wanted to get far from them. There were a large number of Russian exiles living in the US and it would've been a welcoming place.
« Last Edit: June 28, 2007, 07:58:28 PM by grandduchessella »
They also serve who only stand and wait--John Milton
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Eric_Lowe

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Would how she adjusted herself after life in Russia and Europe ?  ???

Offline grandduchessella

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She seems to have adjusted well--after much rootlessness, she settled into the US for 50 years. There were a number of Russian organizations and charities she worked for and with. 
They also serve who only stand and wait--John Milton
Come visit on Pinterest--http://pinterest.com/lawrbk/

Eric_Lowe

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Did she look back in anger or sadness ? Did she ever wanted to go back to Russia ?  ??? ??? ???

Offline Svetabel

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An autobio would have been nice... :P

Princess Vera did write 4 short articles about her life for a magazine "Kadetskaya pereklichka" published by Union of the Russian Kadets (in New-York). One of these articles is in the recent catalogue on her --just a general info, she doesn't go into details of her private life or private life of her relatives. Also she doesn't explain why she moved to the USA.

Her brother George had lived in the US until his death and he was buried there--maybe it seemed as good a place as any since she was rootless at this pint. Perhaps it was just the matter of a fresh start--since the revolution she had mostly lived in Germany (roughly 1922 until 1945 except for 2 years living in London) but Germany was in ruins and her home in Altenburg (her mother's native country) was in the Soviet sector. Given her terror of the Soviets, as recounted in her nightmare, she may have just wanted to get far from them. There were a large number of Russian exiles living in the US and it would've been a welcoming place.

Such reasons make sense...A person without roots and even legal citizenship after all found a refuge/home.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2007, 12:28:29 AM by Svetabel »