Author Topic: Royal Interiors  (Read 717699 times)

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Offline Soane

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Re: Royal Interiors
« Reply #615 on: November 12, 2008, 03:28:34 PM »
*The Neo-Palladian movement.
(lolling) *low-lying.

That bloody spell-check thing. It can't even spell Palladian, lol.

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Royal Interiors
« Reply #616 on: November 12, 2008, 03:59:14 PM »
Yes Sir John Soane. I visited his museum in London. Cool....

Offline Soane

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Re: Royal Interiors
« Reply #617 on: November 12, 2008, 08:14:05 PM »
One of the best undiscovered sights of London. I was there last week looking at their Robert Adam drawings; they should be catalogued online within the next few months...more useless information, but helpful.

Offline Nikola

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Re: Royal Interiors
« Reply #618 on: November 12, 2008, 09:36:41 PM »
Does any of you know the time (right year) when changed pain on the walls of the Picture Gallery (from green to today brown) and Throne Room (from white to today red) at Buckingham palace?

The walls in the Throne Room was white during Queen’s Coronation (1953) and princess Margaret wedding (1960) then the walls painted in the red color (today).  Also the walls in the Picture gallery was green (1960th) then the walls was painted in the today brown color.

Does any of you know the time when this walls changed their color? 


The Throne Room at Buckingham Palace, as far as I know from my research, has been hung with red damask since the room was first designed by Nash for George IV, c.1828. The damask has been replaced on several occasions since then, but I can find no evidence of it ever having been white at the time of HM Queen Elizabeth II's coronation.
The Picture Gallery, by contrast, has seen far greater changes over the period of nearly two centuries. When Nash first designed the gallery the ceiling comprised a central skylight comprising a series of square skylights running the length of the space flanked on either side by a series of small glazed domes set within vaults. From the earliest watercolour of the room I can find (1843) the room is painted a warm yellow/beige with the architectural detailing picked out in white. By 1853, the Picture Gallery had been repainted; the walls were a pale mauve and the ceiling received touches of dark blue and deep yellow.

In 1914 (when the palace received its new facade) the ceiling of the gallery was replaced due to leakage and poor lighting of the pictures. Frank Baines designed a shallow barrel-vaulted ceiling, which although rather dull architecturally, does light the pictures rather well. The original Nash doorcases were also removed and replaced with slightly less exciting examples executed in dark wood. At this point, the walls were hung with an olive green damask woven by Warners. The walls are now hung with a pale pink damask (not that I approve), which I assume was carried out during the 1930s under the aegis of Queen Mary.

Sorry for rambling, hope this helps.

Soane thanks very much for your informations.

I found this photos which shows the Picture Gallery with green damask during the reign of the Queen Elizabeth II:


Th Royal Family in the Picture Gallery (with green damask) at Buckingham palace, november 1971


The Queen in the Picture Gallery (with green damask ) at Buckingham palace, 1966


Today Picture Gallery (with light brown damask) at Buckingham palace

Offline Soane

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Re: Royal Interiors
« Reply #619 on: November 13, 2008, 05:59:03 AM »
Thanks Nikola, I've never seen those pictures before. I have to say that the Picture Gallery looks a lot better in green than it does in pink. I don't understand why it was changed. I'll have to send a letter to Queen Liz and find out, lol.

Offline architect

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Re: Royal Interiors
« Reply #620 on: November 13, 2008, 08:17:05 AM »
The Throne Room at Buckingham Palace was indeed painted white at one time.  As early as 1937 during the coronation of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth (the current Queen's parents) the walls were definitely white as well as during the time of Queen Elizabeth II's wedding.  I am not sure when the silk was re-installed after these events, but I do know from photos that it was changed again sometime between Prince Charles and Diana's wedding and Prince Andrew and Fergies wedding.
You can google any of these events and see photos of the Throne Room.

Offline Nikola

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Re: Royal Interiors
« Reply #621 on: November 13, 2008, 04:36:55 PM »
When The Picture Gallery at Buckingham palace had the green damask on the walls, also the sofas and chairs at Gallery was with the same green damask. Today sofas are with white damask, and chairs are brown.


Princess Margaret at Picture Gallery (1951), when the Gallery walls had the green damask. The princess sit on the sofa, which also have the same green damask as the walls.


Today the same sofas have a white damask.


Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Royal Interiors
« Reply #622 on: November 14, 2008, 11:21:10 AM »
Thanks for showing the photos ! The colour really showed the changes.

Offline StefanOlson

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Re: Royal Interiors
« Reply #623 on: November 16, 2008, 07:44:52 PM »
The Throne Room at Buckingham Palace, as far as I know from my research, has been hung with red damask since the room was first designed by Nash for George IV, c.1828. The damask has been replaced on several occasions since then, but I can find no evidence of it ever having been white at the time of HM Queen Elizabeth II's coronation.
The Picture Gallery, by contrast, has seen far greater changes over the period of nearly two centuries. When Nash first designed the gallery the ceiling comprised a central skylight comprising a series of square skylights running the length of the space flanked on either side by a series of small glazed domes set within vaults. From the earliest watercolour of the room I can find (1843) the room is painted a warm yellow/beige with the architectural detailing picked out in white. By 1853, the Picture Gallery had been repainted; the walls were a pale mauve and the ceiling received touches of dark blue and deep yellow.

In 1914 (when the palace received its new facade) the ceiling of the gallery was replaced due to leakage and poor lighting of the pictures. Frank Baines designed a shallow barrel-vaulted ceiling, which although rather dull architecturally, does light the pictures rather well. The original Nash doorcases were also removed and replaced with slightly less exciting examples executed in dark wood. At this point, the walls were hung with an olive green damask woven by Warners. The walls are now hung with a pale pink damask (not that I approve), which I assume was carried out during the 1930s under the aegis of Queen Mary.

Sorry for rambling, hope this helps.

My understanding is the doorcases were not actually removed.  They were simply encased by the ugly wooden doorcases.  Hopefully at some stage in the future the picture gallery can be restored to its original Nash design which is much more in keeping with the rest of the palace.  The picture gallery was re-painted for Prince Albert 1851, in the colours that you describe.  Nash's original design didn't actually include the original square skylights, they were an addition by Blore in order to provide enough light for the room.  The current picture gallery wall hangings were put in place in 1964.

The throne room walls were painted a gray colour in 1928.  It not very clear why Queen Mary did this, as this had no historical basis as it had been red since the palace was completed (although as the silks were not chosen until the mid 1830's, if I recall correctly, there is no guarantee that this is the colour that Nash would have chosen).  The current hangings are actually a different design to what was there prior to 1928.

…Stefan
Olson Software Ltd, www.palacevirtualtours.com.
Makers of virtual tours of Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle and Versailles

Offline StefanOlson

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Re: Royal Interiors
« Reply #624 on: November 16, 2008, 08:40:23 PM »
Thanks Nikola, I've never seen those pictures before. I have to say that the Picture Gallery looks a lot better in green than it does in pink. I don't understand why it was changed. I'll have to send a letter to Queen Liz and find out, lol.

It was changed in 1964 because the silk had already way outlived its lifetime.  In 1946 they turned the silk over because the green had faded so badly and it was re-hung in the opposite direction so the side that had not seen the light was now displayed.  Now the question of why the colour was changed, well that's really the monarch's choice, although I agree the green was nicer than the current colour.

…Stefan
Olson Software Ltd, www.palacevirtualtours.com.
Makers of virtual tours of Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle and Versailles
« Last Edit: November 16, 2008, 08:45:59 PM by StefanOlson »

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Royal Interiors
« Reply #625 on: November 17, 2008, 12:19:57 PM »
Yes...silk does fade with time.

Offline Soane

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Re: Royal Interiors
« Reply #626 on: November 17, 2008, 02:38:03 PM »
My understanding is the doorcases were not actually removed.  They were simply encased by the ugly wooden doorcases.  Hopefully at some stage in the future the picture gallery can be restored to its original Nash design which is much more in keeping with the rest of the palace.  The picture gallery was re-painted for Prince Albert 1851, in the colours that you describe.  Nash's original design didn't actually include the original square skylights, they were an addition by Blore in order to provide enough light for the room.  The current picture gallery wall hangings were put in place in 1964.

The throne room walls were painted a gray colour in 1928.  It not very clear why Queen Mary did this, as this had no historical basis as it had been red since the palace was completed (although as the silks were not chosen until the mid 1830's, if I recall correctly, there is no guarantee that this is the colour that Nash would have chosen).  The current hangings are actually a different design to what was there prior to 1928.

…Stefan
Olson Software Ltd, www.palacevirtualtours.com.
Makers of virtual tours of Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle and Versailles
[/quote]

Thank you Stephan for your information about the history of the Picture Gallery and Throne Room. Now that I've studied the form of the doorcases more closely, I can see that they would conceivably encase the originals, although at the expense of some of the sculptural detail on the upper registers. It was interesting to read that Nash's original design did not include the central lights; it must certainly have been a rather dark gallery - a good indication of where Nash's sympathies lay: effect before practicality. That said, it would be wonderful to restore Nash's and Blore's celing and perhaps the colour scheme. Do you know of any earlier colour scheme for the Picture Gallery?

Any restoration would certainly place the Gallery in better relation to the other staterooms at Buckingham Palace but it must be remembered that the palace has seen a great number of changes since its completion under Edward Blore for William IV and Queen Victoria, which I won't go into fully here. Suffice to say, under the instruction of Prince Albert - Queen Victoria's consort - several of the palace's principal rooms, including the Picture Gallery and Grand Staircase, were redecorated to satisfy Albert's love for the Italian High Renaissance by Ludwig Gruner. Fortunately, this was expressed largely through changing the colour schemes of rooms rather than through architectural remodelling. By 1848, the Grand Staircase had received elaborate geometrical ploychrome wall decoration that was - in my opinion - entirely at odds with Nash's crisp, heavy classicism. Later, Edward VII commissioned C. H. Bessant and F. Verity to remodel the palace after his accession to the throne in 1901 (carried out from 1902-07). Nash's detailing was removed in many instances and Gruner's polychromy was swept away on a sea of white and gold. The redecoration, although carried out with great care and attention to detail, gives the impression more of a contemporary, smart London hotel and seems somewhat at odds with Nash's more daring, robust classical detailing. The point I'm making is that although many of us would love to restore certain parts of the palace to their original appearance they would always be in contrast to other parts. I think the solution would just be to take each room and each element of that room back to its most beautiful, complimentary and tasteful past form, whilst maintaining decorative coherence.
In particular replacing those awful doorcases and that dreadful ceiling in the Picture Gallery! It's good to have a rant.

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Royal Interiors
« Reply #627 on: November 17, 2008, 02:52:53 PM »
Some changesmay be for the better while some may not be.

Offline StefanOlson

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Re: Royal Interiors
« Reply #628 on: November 17, 2008, 09:15:37 PM »
Thank you Stephan for your information about the history of the Picture Gallery and Throne Room. Now that I've studied the form of the doorcases more closely, I can see that they would conceivably encase the originals, although at the expense of some of the sculptural detail on the upper registers. It was interesting to read that Nash's original design did not include the central lights; it must certainly have been a rather dark gallery - a good indication of where Nash's sympathies lay: effect before practicality. That said, it would be wonderful to restore Nash's and Blore's celing and perhaps the colour scheme. Do you know of any earlier colour scheme for the Picture Gallery?

Any restoration would certainly place the Gallery in better relation to the other staterooms at Buckingham Palace but it must be remembered that the palace has seen a great number of changes since its completion under Edward Blore for William IV and Queen Victoria, which I won't go into fully here. Suffice to say, under the instruction of Prince Albert - Queen Victoria's consort - several of the palace's principal rooms, including the Picture Gallery and Grand Staircase, were redecorated to satisfy Albert's love for the Italian High Renaissance by Ludwig Gruner. Fortunately, this was expressed largely through changing the colour schemes of rooms rather than through architectural remodelling. By 1848, the Grand Staircase had received elaborate geometrical ploychrome wall decoration that was - in my opinion - entirely at odds with Nash's crisp, heavy classicism. Later, Edward VII commissioned C. H. Bessant and F. Verity to remodel the palace after his accession to the throne in 1901 (carried out from 1902-07). Nash's detailing was removed in many instances and Gruner's polychromy was swept away on a sea of white and gold. The redecoration, although carried out with great care and attention to detail, gives the impression more of a contemporary, smart London hotel and seems somewhat at odds with Nash's more daring, robust classical detailing. The point I'm making is that although many of us would love to restore certain parts of the palace to their original appearance they would always be in contrast to other parts. I think the solution would just be to take each room and each element of that room back to its most beautiful, complimentary and tasteful past form, whilst maintaining decorative coherence.
In particular replacing those awful doorcases and that dreadful ceiling in the Picture Gallery! It's good to have a rant.

Yes, I think that the top of the doorcases would have to have been removed.  I'm not quite sure what happened to them, but there would be enough photographs to restore them.  The other thing they would have to restore, which is often overlooked is the parquet floor.  Again, it is incomprehensible, but they removed the very attractive parquet floor that was originally there and replaced it with a completely boring floor., I'm not exactly certain of what the original colours of the picture gallery were.  The difficulty with the colour schemes across the whole palace was the fact that Nash was dismissed before any silks were up or even decided on.  What was in place was the scagliola, although this had deteriorated sufficiently that much of it was already removed during the reign of William IV before decorating decisions had been made.

Hopefully during the changeover between reigns, after the queen dies, there will be the opportunity to do some work in the palace.  The big problem remains the cost and the fact that in real terms, the money available from the taxpayer for maintenance of the palaces is continuing to fall.  Virtually all of the state apartments at Buckingham Palace desperately need regilding, it's very sad to compare them to the newly gilded rooms at Windsor Castle which give an impression of how they would have looked during the reign of George IV.

…Stefan
Olson Software Ltd, www.palacevirtualtours.com.
Makers of virtual tours of Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle and Versailles

Offline Nikola

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Re: Royal Interiors
« Reply #629 on: November 17, 2008, 09:24:40 PM »
Thank you Stephan for your information about the history of the Picture Gallery and Throne Room. Now that I've studied the form of the doorcases more closely, I can see that they would conceivably encase the originals, although at the expense of some of the sculptural detail on the upper registers. It was interesting to read that Nash's original design did not include the central lights; it must certainly have been a rather dark gallery - a good indication of where Nash's sympathies lay: effect before practicality. That said, it would be wonderful to restore Nash's and Blore's celing and perhaps the colour scheme. Do you know of any earlier colour scheme for the Picture Gallery?

Any restoration would certainly place the Gallery in better relation to the other staterooms at Buckingham Palace but it must be remembered that the palace has seen a great number of changes since its completion under Edward Blore for William IV and Queen Victoria, which I won't go into fully here. Suffice to say, under the instruction of Prince Albert - Queen Victoria's consort - several of the palace's principal rooms, including the Picture Gallery and Grand Staircase, were redecorated to satisfy Albert's love for the Italian High Renaissance by Ludwig Gruner. Fortunately, this was expressed largely through changing the colour schemes of rooms rather than through architectural remodelling. By 1848, the Grand Staircase had received elaborate geometrical ploychrome wall decoration that was - in my opinion - entirely at odds with Nash's crisp, heavy classicism. Later, Edward VII commissioned C. H. Bessant and F. Verity to remodel the palace after his accession to the throne in 1901 (carried out from 1902-07). Nash's detailing was removed in many instances and Gruner's polychromy was swept away on a sea of white and gold. The redecoration, although carried out with great care and attention to detail, gives the impression more of a contemporary, smart London hotel and seems somewhat at odds with Nash's more daring, robust classical detailing. The point I'm making is that although many of us would love to restore certain parts of the palace to their original appearance they would always be in contrast to other parts. I think the solution would just be to take each room and each element of that room back to its most beautiful, complimentary and tasteful past form, whilst maintaining decorative coherence.
In particular replacing those awful doorcases and that dreadful ceiling in the Picture Gallery! It's good to have a rant.



Dear Soane, thanks very much for your informations. It's really help.

How I can see you have a very fantastic informations about Buckingham palace interior and I must ask you for small help.
Can you tell me more (full) informations (history, decorations, arrange, furniture... ) about Grand Staircase, East gallery (especially about this room, because I don't know nothing about history, decorations...) and Ballroom?

Thanks