Author Topic: Princess Mathilde Bonaparte  (Read 28239 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline gogm

  • Graf
  • ***
  • Posts: 361
    • View Profile
    • Grand Ladies
Re: Princess Mathilde Bonaparte
« Reply #30 on: May 03, 2006, 09:33:24 PM »
She was a good artist. I'm impressed!

Her salon was frequented by artistic greats of her time as well.

Offline Alexander_II

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 14
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
    • View Profile
Re: Princess Mathilde Bonaparte
« Reply #31 on: May 13, 2006, 09:32:36 PM »
It was agreed that Mathilde’s dowry in total consist of 290,000 French Francs of which FF 50,000 was composed of her personal jewellery, wardrobe, and musical instruments. The balance of FF 240,000 was payable in cash and was to be presented to her future husband and if unpaid to Anatole’s heir(s) without fail on demand and within a month of his death. In the event that Anatole’s death preceded Mathilde's an amount of FF 500,000 was payable to Anatole’s heir(s). At the time, a French Franc was a gold coin, about 1/4 of an ounce in weight. In present terms that is around 75 U.S. dollars – forming a collosal sum.

To make this arrangement even odder, Anatole was proclaimed the owner of his wife’s ‘diamonds’, due to further machinations by Jérôme.  Although Jérôme agreed to provide the dowry he pleaded a lack of cash.  So to ensure that Jérôme kept his side of the bargain Anatole agreed to pay off Jérôme’s debt and to raise cash by purchasing relics of the Empire from Jérôme, to be moved to his Villa di San Donato and his hotel in Paris.  Anatole purchased a statue of the Emperor Napoleon for FF 11,000 and statues of Jérôme and Madame Mère for FF 10,000 each. Jérôme then proceeded to sell the jewels of Catherine of Wurtemberg, worth FF 1,000,000, to Anatole, though a portion of these jewels should have been the original contents of Mathilde’s dowry. The future son-in-law not only upheld his agreed-upon obligations but was also forced to galvanise and support the obligations of his future father-in-law to prevent the wedding plans from collapsing. The sad situation in the end was that Anatole’s generous aid for his future father-in-law went for nought. Not one cent was ever contributed by Jérôme towards Mathilde’s dowry. In addition to her wardrobe, furniture and musical instruments what her father provided were two snuff boxes, an imperial eagle in silver, and the sword of Francois I, taken by Napoleon’s troops during the Peninsular War.
 
Furthermore, Jérôme and family members received an annual pension of FF 118,000 from Anatole. Of this FF 24,000 was for the father, FF 6,000 for his son, FF 1,200 for Madame de Redding, Mathilde’s good friend and minder, and FF 85,000 for Mathilde.  This deceit seeped into the foundation of the marriage and acted like poison to contribute towards its dissolution in six short years.



« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Alexander_II »

Offline britt.25

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1159
    • View Profile
Re: Princess Mathilde Bonaparte
« Reply #32 on: May 14, 2006, 01:52:14 PM »
Very interesting info, thanks, I am very interested in the Bonaparte members, but I haven´t read a book on Mathilde until now, so thanks :) :)
La vérité est plus importante que l'amour

     Marie Bonaparte (1882-1962)

Offline pouvoir aux canard

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 79
  • Sufficit animus
    • View Profile
Re: Princess Mathilde Bonaparte
« Reply #33 on: July 06, 2006, 03:32:49 PM »
Salve,

The "more casual portrait" of Mathilde posted by gogm is not Mathilde's I guess...
Purhaps it is Julia Allard, wife of Alphonse Daudet (a french writer with a huge international celebrity at this time), relative of Mathilde ???

Many reports on Mathilde, at home in Saint-Gratien, at home in Paris, dinning, at Mr. de Rothschild's house, painting, talking about Empress Eugénie, and so on...  in "Le journal des Goncourt" of the two Goncourt brothers Jules and Edmond (2 writers, relatives of Mathilde) ... more interesting the second part, wrote by Edmont de Goncourt who create the Prix Goncourt (litterature).

C-C

Offline Paul

  • Boyar
  • **
  • Posts: 225
  • born a century too late
    • View Profile
Re: Princess Mathilde Bonaparte
« Reply #34 on: July 06, 2006, 11:59:35 PM »
Somewhere I'd read that Demidoff was a sadist, and that her Romanov relatives sided with her over the separation.

Was this true, or part of the "unkind literary campaign" of Matilde & her writer friends?
The only real possession you'll ever have is your character.
Tom Wolfe
US author & journalist (1931 - )

Offline Morecambrian

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 51
  • I Love YaBB 2!
    • View Profile
Re: Princess Mathilde Bonaparte
« Reply #35 on: July 07, 2006, 01:40:28 AM »
The wife of Anatole's nephew Prince Elim Demidoff mentions how  Mathilde drew her attention to the sumpteous emeralds she was wearing,telling her they would be hers one day.After Mathilde's death Prince Elim contacted her Bonaparte nephew and executor concerning the Demidov gems and was told they had not been there  at the time of the Princesses death......In the subsuquent sale of the Princess's property the Demidov's found no trace of any items that had come from their side of the family.

Offline pouvoir aux canard

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 79
  • Sufficit animus
    • View Profile
Re: Princess Mathilde Bonaparte
« Reply #36 on: July 07, 2006, 04:43:21 AM »
Mathide was said to be engaged to czarevitch and to Louis-Napoleon (N.III). But mainly the informations are from Mathilde ? Or there are documents on the subjects?? :-?

About the titles of Demidoff: he was Count Demidov (Russian nobility raised by his grandgrandfather) and from 1837 first Prince of San Donato (Pope' nobility)

About the separation: I cannot now remember the name of the author of the text who said that when the czar decree the separation (1846) he mainly considered some terrific testimonies about the dayly life of the two. This text belongs to a french historic magazine of the '70 (1975?? Historia or Miroir de l'Histoire?? Was the author André Castelot?? I apologize, I am not pretty sure - it is in my father's house, in France ::)

But the czar was also a wittness: between 1840 and 1846, he often - when P.M. and A.D. were in Russia -arrived without previous information at Demidoff' House for dinner. Czar anyway loved Mathilde (daughter of his beloved cousin Catherine de Wurtemberg) and hated Demidoff as the grandgrandgrandson of a commoner (blacksmith in the city of Toula), as a man able to try to "buy" the mistresses of the czar, to betray his own religion with the Pope to buy a prince' title, to offend Ambassador Count Orloff, ecc, ecc... He said, after the wedding of Mathilde that he was not able to forgive his father and her for the choice of the groom, but afterthat, he forgived Mathilde but not her father Jéròme... (see on this thread the post with the horrible "wedding' financial accord" propsed by Jéròme !!).  :-/

About the human possibilities of Jéròme: Popelin, second husband of Mathilde, told to Madame Daudet that story received from the family of King Joseph (Also Edmond de Goncourt  tells in his Journal) : for the first wedding of Mathilde, there were 20 000 francs-or for her (in "la corbeille", the wedding presents FOR HER). Going away from Florence with Demidoff for a journey of some days to Rome, she asked his aunt Julie Clary (the wife of King Joseph) to keep the gold-money. When Mathilde turned, Queen Julie was attonished when Mathilde asked for money...  and said to Mathilde that Jéròme, a few days before, took all the money saying to Julie that it was the will of Mathilde wrote from Rome in a letter to his father !!   :-[

About sexual sadic possibilities of Demidoff, read Journal des Gongourt, Tome 1, page of 25 january 1863 ... really I cannot report the text here... ;D ;D ;D

C-C

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by pouvoir_aux_canard »

Offline pouvoir aux canard

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 79
  • Sufficit animus
    • View Profile
Re: Princess Mathilde Bonaparte
« Reply #37 on: July 08, 2006, 02:40:48 PM »
La Princesse Mathilde, on 1853, bought a castel near Paris, on the territory of the little city of Enghien. It was Chateau de Luçay, a great mansion with one floor. She created a second floor, a different park and gardens. Nearby, there was le Chateau Catinat, a smaller mansion she bought on 1857 "for the friends's rest". On summer, she received scientists, writers, painters, musicians, for his own pleasure and also because she decided to became a cultural power and a go-between relating the french intelligenzia and his cousin the emperor N.III. During autumn and winter she received in Paris, in his town house rue de Courcelles until 1870 and (after a short exile in Bruxelles) rue de Berry until 1904. Wednesday for writers, painters on Friday.

This very important salon had a positive effect on all the french artistic life. It had been said of her that elle accueillait tous ses visiteurs avec un sansfaçon qui était l'extrême raffinement de la condescendance et de la politesse princière. From his cousin she obtained many advantages for sciencists, artists, writers. She "decided" who became academician, had a decoration, etc. She failed only on the question of the liberty of the press: his cousin agreed with her on the idea of a free press but he never abolished the stupid, heavy, blind french censure of second empire (after the defeat of 1870 free press were an important motive for the tumble of the empire)

Here is a partial list of his guests: Hyppolite Taine, Alexandre Dumas father and son; Émile Augier, Victorien Sardou, François Coppée, George Sand, Ernest Lavisse, Frédéric Masson, Ludovic Halévy. Henri Houssaye, Albert Vandal, Guy de Maupassant, Alphonse Daudet, Edmont About, Octave Feuillet, Eugène Violet-Leduc, José-Maria de Hérédia, Émile Gebhart,  Jules Sandeau (writer friend of George Sand); Eugène Delacroix, Paul Delaroche, Ary Scheffer, Paul Beaudry, Gustave Boulanger, JeanLéon Gérôme; physiologist Claude Bernard, physician Alexandre Cabanel; Jean-Auguste Ingres, Horace Vernet, Charles Haas, Eugène Fromentin, Ganderay, Paul Bourget, Hector Berlioz, Georges de Porto-Riche, composers Louis-Joseph Diemer, Reynaldo Hahn; Léon Bonnat, Paul Gavarni, Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux, Gustave Flaubert, Marcel Proust, duke and duchess de Gramont, Jacques-Émile Blanche, singer Marie Marimon, Gustave Doré, Geneviève and Émile Strauss, Georges Bizet, Alfred de Musset, Gabriel Fauré, Camille Saint-Saëns, Franz Liszt, Charles Gounod, Félix Nadar (she helped him to became a photograph), François Arago, astronom Urbain Leverrier, Ernest Renan, Marcellin Berthelot, Louis Pasteur, Théophile Gautier (she gived him money to "look at his library"); Charles Augustin Sainte-Beuve, Louis Veuillot, Eugène Viollet-le-Duc, Ferdinand de Lesseps , Prosper Mérimée, Charles Ephrussi, Robert de Montesquiou,  Edmond et Jules Goncourt.... (If you need details upon the names ask for it)

Here is a letter of his beloved Théophile Gauthier (in Correspondance Générale de Théophile Gauthier - quote 1869) who gives an idea of the spirit of the salon:

Princesse,
Je suis très touché de l'intérêt que vous daignez prendre à ma santé. Si je n'ai pas répondu plutôt, c'est que j'espérais vous porter moi-même de mes nouvelles. J'ai une petite douleur au pied qui m'empêche de me chausser (...) Chacun a ses petites misères et tout le monde n'est pas taillé en plein marbre de Carrare ou de Paros comme votre Altesse impériale. Si les déesses ne sont jamais malades, les pauvres mortels, leurs adorateurs, ne jouissent pas de cette sereine inaltérabilité. En tous cas, guéri ou non guéri, j'irai à Saint-Gratien mercredi, même avec une babouche et un brodequin. « Qui regarde vos pieds? » avez-vous dit dans une circonstance pareille, car, comme le paon, je me préoccupe beaucoup de mes pattes, mais je ferai la roue et votre auguste bonté ne regardera que mes plumes.

De votre Altesse impériale, Madame, j'ai l'honneur d'être le très humble et très dévoué sonnettiste*.

                                                                            Théophile Gautier

* sonnettiste:  a word Gauthier creates to express the idea that he is the poet of Mathilde, a poet asked to write only some poems called sonnets.

Between so many intellectuals very differents (soul, style, ideas, judgments, estetic and politic earnestness)  she tried until his death to provoke exchanges, solidarity and frienship.
His salon was called "La cour Medicis" (the Medicis' court) because she helped many artists, writers and scientists.

As royals and aristocratic guests we are sure she received :  Emperor, Empress, duchesse d'Albe (sister of Empress), comtesse de Teba (mother of Empress) duc de Morny, prince Camillo Borghèse, prince Napoléon and family, princes Louis, Victor and Roland Bonaparte,  princess Jeanne Bonaparte, princesse von  Metternich, duchesse de Persigny, comte  Alfred-Émilien Nieuwerkerke, comte Primoli and wife and son comte Giuseppe Primoli, Wurtemberg royals and russian royals when in Paris, etc, etc.

His salon competed with some other french salons but mainly with the salon of Pauline Metternich, a very different one, but also a very interesting one.

She helped city of Enghien, gave a school, a church, created a foundation for blind girls, a part of his park, ecc, ecc. She is buried in the church of Enghien. His castle is now an estate with appartments, called "Le chateau de la Princesse Mathilde"

C-C
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by pouvoir_aux_canard »