Author Topic: Felix Yusupov and the murder of Rasputin  (Read 62201 times)

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Offline Romanov_fan

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Re: Felix Yusupov and the murder of Rasputin
« Reply #30 on: November 18, 2005, 11:50:40 AM »
He certainly did like to be the center of attention, I agree. I think he knew he would become notorious for this deed, when he did it, no doubt. I'm not sure he thought that this was his chance to echo in history in general, but I think he knew history would remember him as the murderer of Rasputin, and I think he welcomed that. He didn't do it to be famous in general; I think he, with his flamboyant personality, thought he would be remembered anyway.

Sage

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Re: Felix Yusupov and the murder of Rasputin
« Reply #31 on: November 23, 2005, 08:10:14 AM »
I do agree with the rest of you, Felix wanted the lions share credit so he got it. Pushkevich also wrote about the murder afterward, but I guess he didn't have that same charisma to be truly memorable.

It was probably part of Felix's fundemental character, here was an oppotunity to be the talk of the town and he ran with that. The guy was after all no stranger to scandal and attention, probably even thrived on it.

Perhaps he didn't realise the full implications at the time, but certainly as everything evolved made the best of it by writing his memoirs, that libel suit over 'Rasputin & the Empress' etc.  

As for his actual motivation for the crime, hmm haven't quite figured that out. Could be all manner of things, perhaps a combination of everything already mentioned. Yes he may have wanted notority, but never struck me as having the nature to actually kill. He wouldn't even go hunting. So there must have been something very powerful to have prompted such drastic action. Even if he was just to be associated with it.  

I am just starting to write a documentary novel about Rasputin's murder, probably focusing on Felix. So am getting all my theories and research together ready for that.

james_h

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Re: Felix Yusupov and the murder of Rasputin
« Reply #32 on: November 23, 2005, 12:12:26 PM »


I suspect Dimitri pulled the trigger that ended Rasputin.

Offline Romanov_fan

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Re: Felix Yusupov and the murder of Rasputin
« Reply #33 on: November 29, 2005, 10:33:51 AM »
The reasons that Felix murdered Rasputin are complex yes, and no one could sort them out completely. You could have a list of ten items, and you could most likely continue it, in my opinion. He was someone who enjoyed a show, enjoyed being the center of attention. I think his natural expectation in life was that he would be the center of attention.This event guarenteed him attention-how could he pass that up? I do think he was the primary murderer of Rasputin, but he wasn't the only one, as many people automatically assume. Perhaps as the primary murderer he deserves credit, but not all the credit. He wasn't the murdering type, but then murders are often complex things, done for a variety of reasons. Rasputin's was no different. Yakov Yurovsky and crew were much more deep in blood lust than Prince Felix Yusupov ever was, for sure. I think Felix liked to take all the credit, in every situation of his life. ::)

AkshayChavan

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Re: Felix Yusupov and the murder of Rasputin
« Reply #34 on: December 02, 2005, 07:00:10 PM »
On topic of murder of Rasputin , I came across 2 books by Greg king. First is titled " The Murder of Rasputin: The Truth About Prince Felix Youssoupov and the Mad Monk Who Helped Bring Down the Romanovs " published in 1995 and second is "The man who killed rasputin"published in 2001. If someone could please tell me if they are same books with different names or different books?

Offline Romanov_fan

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Re: Felix Yusupov and the murder of Rasputin
« Reply #35 on: December 13, 2005, 10:24:42 AM »
Actually, that has always confused me too. I would go to Amazon, type in both, and then see if there are different results, and it is different books. If you can't find one of those titles on there but can find another then most likely they are one and the same.

lancashireladandre

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Re: Felix Yusupov and the murder of Rasputin
« Reply #36 on: December 13, 2005, 12:14:35 PM »
Quote

I suspect Dimitri pulled the trigger that ended Rasputin.

At one time it was said that  Felix's servant Tesphe/Tesfay was the person who actually administered the "coup de grace".Whatever the servant's role he held a special position in the staff pecking order....He was among the 5 servants( there was also a English governess) who accompanied the Youssoupoff family aboard the HMS Marlborough.In exile Felix liked to hold court at various gatherings,retelling the story of the murder.....

Richard_Cullen

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Re: Felix Yusupov and the murder of Rasputin
« Reply #37 on: December 28, 2005, 10:12:29 AM »
Hi

This strand should probably be in the Rasputin strand but I hope i don't upset too mnay of you by saying you are way off the mark in pursuing the role of Felix and dimitry in the plot - they were not the murderers.  I am not very concerned with who actually killed him, but I am convinced it was the British and i believe this is now gathering considerable academic weight.

Rasputin's murder is never out of my thoughts for long and I think I and others have substantially proved that much of Yussupov's and Purishkevich's version of events were total fabrications.

I think yuo have to ask yourself what would have happened had Purishkevich lived, he was the first to right his version of events, maybe he would have been more famous than Felix?

Felix needed to make money after the revolution and Lost Splendour etc were ways of creating wealth. Without being sexist Felix was a drama queen.  I hope one day brian will be able to complete the floor plan of the Palace to show how far felix had to run from the basement to the main dorrs pf the Palace when he allegedly ran after the escaping Rasputin.

There was nothing heroic in Rasputin's murder, it was cold and calculated.  Felix did have a role, they used his rooms within his father's Palace.

Felix was a showman, a rather insignificant fellow, who without wealth had little going for him.

Dimitry didn't pull the trigger, he might not have been there when R died, or was he, who knows.  the timings make a mockery of what P and Y said about what happened.

I am just having a slide made up of the angle of the first shot (supposed first shot) that passed through the stomach and liver, it was delivered from amost awkward angle and probably means that R was seated at the time he was shot.  A second shot from the back and then a coup de grace.  No reckless firing because of the angle of firing and the danger that the murderers may well have shot each other.

Probably assaulted or tortured have what you will prior to death, with a convenient little story to explain away the inuries at a later time (Y's alleged frenzied attack after R was dead).

Had we just a shred more evidence from the scene (the basement) if it was the scene maybe we could have more clarity.

But why for 90 odd years did we miss the fact that the shot to the head was from point blank range to the forehead and not from 20 paces behind as P suggests?

I had seen the pictures of the injuries before but until the BBC asked me to look at the post mortem pictures in detail did i notice, what had been staring me in the face for years before that he had been shot at point blank range.

regards and season's greetings

Richard

Devarani

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Re: Felix Yusupov and the murder of Rasputin
« Reply #38 on: December 29, 2005, 01:22:03 PM »
Hi to everybody ;D,

I recently bought a new version (this one is a french version entitled Memoirs which taled his story before and during his exil) of the book Lost Splendor, but I can't still find exactly the relation between Félix and Raspoutine  :'(. I know that Félix killed him as well for personnal (cause there was a kind of homoerotic relation between the two but mostly from Félix) reasons as political. It is said that Félix killed him 'cause he was in love with Raspoutine and this one rejected his propositions 'cause his was most interested in Irina.
So here is my question:
Was there a real physical relation between the two?And maybe something more important than just simply this physical relation? Because I don't know if you have ever read this french version, 'cause Félix tales and lets some strange and precious clues ???

Thanks and I'm so happy to be a new member of this Forum abt the Prince Youssoupoff of whom I am totally in love with ;)
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Devarani »

Annie

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Re: Felix Yusupov and the murder of Rasputin
« Reply #39 on: December 29, 2005, 04:28:01 PM »
Quote
Hi to everybody ;D,

I recently bought a new version (this one is a french version entitled Memoirs which taled his story before and during his exil) of the book Lost Splendor, but I can't still find exactly the relation between Félix and Raspoutine  :'(. I know that Félix killed him as well for personnal (cause there was a kind of homoerotic relation between the two but mostly from Félix) reasons as political. It is said that Félix killed him 'cause he was in love with Raspoutine and this one rejected his propositions 'cause his was most interested in Irina.
So here is my question:
Was there a real physical relation between the two?And maybe something more important than just simply this physical relation? Because I don't know if you have ever read this french version, 'cause Félix tales and lets some strange and precious clues ???

Thanks and I'm so happy to be a new member of this Forum abt the Prince Youssoupoff of who I am totally in love with ;)


I don't believe there was anything physical, because while Felix was most likely bi/gay, Rasputin only went with women. This is not to say that Felix wasn't interested in Rasputin, and that could have had something to do it, I can't say. I personally can't imagine Felix being sexually interested in Rasputin, since he was usually dirty and scruffy, and Felix liked beauty, elegance, and clean, perfume smelling people.

Felix himself admits first going to see Rasputin with Munya Golovina, a friend and supporter. While he refers to her in his book only as Mlle. G, this is who she was. In other books about Rasputin, like Greg King's and Radzinsky's, we learn that after the death of Felix's brother in a duel, Munya, who had been in love with him, became distraught and wanted to lie on his grave and die there. She was determined to see him again. Believing Rasputin could conjure the dead, she went to see him. Assuming from these reports, this is why Felix went with her, to contact his dead brother.

He became fascinated with the starets, and his gypsy music lifestyle. He admits to having been hypnotized by Rasputin until his body was redendered helpless. The reasons he wanted to be hypnotized are up for debate, there are several theories, according to several books.

It is also important to know that Rasputin was hated deeply by Felix's mother, Zenaida. There are letters dating back as early as 1913 in which she, Ella (Alexandra's sister, Dmitri's aunt who raised him), and Anna Rodzianko, Zenaida's cousin and wife of Duma President Michael Rodzianko,( who had once proclaimed he'd have killed Rasputin himself if he weren't so 'old and fat!') which discuss their dislike of Rasputin and how they consider him a threat to Russia. These letters are written with code for each character, Rasputin being 'the book.' Some of these can be read right here on this site. Zenaida and Ella were eventually disowned by Alexandra for trying to tell her to get rid of Rasputin, and Felix's father. old Felix, lost his job as "Lord Mayor" of Moscow when he expressed his opinion that Rasputin be run out of town and away from Alexandra. So you see, he, as well as Dmitri, had a person stake in Rasputin's demise. Their families had been shamed becauses of him. Not only were their relatives against him, they also saw themselves as heroes to their country by getting rid of him since most nobility considered him to be ruining Russia and bringing down the dynasty.

Another note on Dmitri: there were those at the time who wanted to oust the Tsar and install Dmitri as Tsar. This is perhaps why Felix and Purishkevitch deny Dmitri had an important role in the murder, while some historians feel he did, and may even have delivered the final fatal gunshot.

Finally, welcome to another Felix lover! I hope to see you around more Felix threads! :)
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Annie »

Devarani

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Re: Felix Yusupov and the murder of Rasputin
« Reply #40 on: December 30, 2005, 03:10:12 AM »
Yes :), you've said that you could not imagine that Félix could once ever been in love with Rasputine, but i read somewhere that a long time after Raspoutin's death one of his daughter related that once she saw Félix completely naked in Raspoutine's office ???. Don't know if it this true but it seems very strange 'cause when Félix went to R's house to be cured, be naked or not was not former part of his restablisment :-/.
But now you right 'cause this does not mean that Félix could be in love with R.
Also something which seems to be clear in the book Memoirs, is the relationship between Félix and Dimitri. I think they were more than just good friends......'cause Dimitri was as well in love with Irina as he was with  Félix too........ 'cause when Félix says to Dimitri that he wants to marry her..........we can see D's disappointement not only toward Irina but also toward Félix (like most of Félix good friends).............. . And there are lots of little detail like that.

Well i don't what you think abt it but can you give me your point of view :)  
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Devarani »

crotalo

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Re: Felix Yusupov and the murder of Rasputin
« Reply #41 on: December 30, 2005, 03:15:19 AM »
See the film "Belle de jour"

Devarani

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Re: Felix Yusupov and the murder of Rasputin
« Reply #42 on: December 30, 2005, 04:17:37 AM »
It is the movie with Catherine Deneuve???
Why ???should I wacht it? because, is there a relation ??? with the Yusupovs' story?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Devarani »

lancashireladandre

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Re: Felix Yusupov and the murder of Rasputin
« Reply #43 on: December 30, 2005, 05:28:04 AM »
Felix got the most "publicity" out of the murder BECAUSE HE MADE SURE HE DID. As Truman Capote once said "Everybody has their 15 minutes of fame " well Felix made this his  & stretched it out and out and out......From the minute he got back to Petrograd after the revolution he was entertaining guests in the basement rooms with gypsies singing.....( see, Wilfred Blunt's :Lady Muriel, Methuen 1962).In exile he spent 4 decades telling " his version" of the murder.There are several accounts of this. All in all. Felix made a meal of it...What Irina thought is unrecorded, but there are pointers that she was at times in a state of stifled hysteria.....She must have loved him very much.

Devarani

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Re: Felix Yusupov and the murder of Rasputin
« Reply #44 on: January 01, 2006, 09:31:15 AM »
Sorry but i can't still see the relation between the movie "Belle de Jour" and Félix and Rasputine relation ???.
And Annie, you've said that Félix was attracted by the beauty, elegance,well all the posh things but even if Raspoutine was a dirty and scruffy man, ha had something which completely and definitively attracted Félix. Of course in his books, Félix want us to remember him as the man who killed Raspoutine and also as the man who was the first who hated him in Russia. But everybody know that Félix was a great liar. Always deforming the truth to his profit. And of course he would never put and admit  that somewhere Raspoutine had a very important place in his life and heart. But I repeat that this was not reciprocal. And that is why, maybe this personal reason joined later with the political reason  led him to kill the one who rejected Félix because he preferred power and women to him.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Devarani »