Author Topic: Nicholas and Alexandra (1971)  (Read 269680 times)

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Russian_Duchess_#5

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Re: Nicholas & Alexandra VHS & DVD
« Reply #285 on: February 11, 2006, 01:26:48 PM »
I agree.......all of the GDs should have been switched around.  ::)except Anastasiya....she was ok.

Sofia

SuSu

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Re: Nicholas & Alexandra VHS & DVD
« Reply #286 on: February 13, 2006, 12:05:22 PM »
Please can anyone remind me which actress played the part of Dowager Emperess Marie Feodorovna? Thank you.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by SuSu »

anna

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Re: Nicholas & Alexandra VHS & DVD
« Reply #287 on: February 13, 2006, 01:13:07 PM »
The Dowager Empress was played by Irene Worth, although born in the USA she was an acclaimed stage actress with the RSC in Britain. She died in 2002.
She won three Tony Awards and a honorary C.B.E. (Commander of the Order of the British Empire).

Hope this helped

Anna

SuSu

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Re: Nicholas & Alexandra VHS & DVD
« Reply #288 on: February 14, 2006, 12:13:38 PM »
Thanks Anna. I think she did a fantastic job as the Dowager Emperess plus she looked a lot like her in my opinion.

Caleb

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Re: Nicholas & Alexandra VHS & DVD
« Reply #289 on: February 14, 2006, 08:26:11 PM »
I think that they have Alix as almost this evil woman. I don't think they showed her as a suffering mother of a hemophiliac. Instead they portrayed her as this extremely formidable woman, who seemed willing to destroy anybody that stood in her way. (Though I do think the actors were skilled), just the portrayal was poorly done. But it's a good movie on an entertainment, not historical, level. I do think that scene when Alexei kisses his father, just before they get executed is touching. Or in the scene when Alexandra is making the sign of the cross, you can see Dr. Botkin trying to shield one of the grand duchesses, as with Nicholas with Alexei. As far as accuracy goes, I think that 1920's Russian film of the Revolution was more accurate in how they portray the execution.

lovy

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Re: Nicholas & Alexandra VHS & DVD
« Reply #290 on: February 14, 2006, 11:54:07 PM »
I didn't see Alix as that evil. She did seem to be suffering because of the disease she passed onto her son, just not ... a good ruler  :P :-/

Offline RealAnastasia

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Re: Nicholas & Alexandra VHS & DVD
« Reply #291 on: February 15, 2006, 09:52:51 PM »
Quote
I'm not a big fan of this movie, but I do love the scene when the Tsar returns from Pskov after abdicating. He breaks down in front of Alix saying, "I'm sorry" over and over again.  :'(


I do agree! And I think the other heartbreaking scene is when they are murdered.

RealAnastasia.

lovy

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Re: Nicholas & Alexandra VHS & DVD
« Reply #292 on: February 15, 2006, 10:57:10 PM »
I find the music pretty sad.

azrael7171918

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Re: Nicholas & Alexandra VHS & DVD
« Reply #293 on: February 16, 2006, 07:32:30 AM »
What 1920s Russian film?

Azrael

Caleb

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Re: Nicholas & Alexandra VHS & DVD
« Reply #294 on: February 16, 2006, 07:29:57 PM »
I forget the name, but much of it was shown in the movie "Last Days of the Last Tsar"

Olga_Anne

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Re: Nicholas & Alexandra VHS & DVD
« Reply #295 on: February 16, 2006, 09:19:45 PM »
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Overall, the most heart-breaking scene for me was when Nagorny was taken away from Aleksei.
Sofia

Same here. Also when Gilliard and the nurse were seperated (sp?) from the IF when they were getting on the train to Yekaterinburg.

Offline Margarita Markovna

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Re: Nicholas & Alexandra VHS & DVD
« Reply #296 on: February 17, 2006, 05:21:49 PM »
The most heartbreaking part of the movie, to me, was when the family is waiting in the cellar and when Yurovsky comes in, Alexei reaches up and kisses his father.  :'(

Janet_W.

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Re: Nicholas & Alexandra VHS & DVD
« Reply #297 on: February 18, 2006, 12:06:36 AM »
I found the scene depicting the reunion of Nicholas and Alexandra incredibly painful to watch since it illustrated those times when two people who love each other very much are overwhelmed by emotion, grief and, yes, the memories of previous disagreements, but are trying very hard to reconnect. I did not find it overdrawn; on the contrary, I thought it neatly encapsulated a number of points that the screenwriter wanted to illustrate:

1) Nicholas, in the tradition of men of that period, did his best to keep "a stiff upper lip," but once reunited with his wife--the woman who, though his lover, also could offer him a maternal love that his own mother did not--all defences crumbled;

2) The pressures of his reign, increased by the war and his abdication, had to have taken an enormous emotional and psychological toll on Nicholas. The screenwriter depicted this by showing him walking the gauntlet of hostile soldiers, then finally finding safe haven with his wife, who nonetheless had been the very person who challenged him to "be Peter the Great"--a challenge he could not fulfill. His sense of failure had to have been profound, and his constricted features and sobbing voice would be a part of that;

3) Although united, a certain gulf between Nicholas and Alexandra still existed. He would reconcile his abdication as God's will and attempt to be friendly with their captors; Alexandra, on the other hand, remained proud and distant to all but her closest circle.

4) The screenwriter had them drop to their knees because in moments of great helplessnes and shock this happens to many people (it has happened to me) but showed them facing each other, each attempting, despite tears and grief, to bridge that gulf and let the other one know that despite the abdication, the love between them was not extinguished.  

And from Anna Alexandrovna Vyrubova's book, reproduced on this website:

CHAPTER XV

In anxiety almost unbearable we waited until the morning of March 9 (Russian) the arrival of the Emperor . . . For a time at least the happiness of reunion blotted out the suspense of the past and the gloomy uncertainty of the future. But afterwards, alone, behind their own closed doors, the emotion of the betrayed and deserted Emperor completely overcame his self-control and he sobbed like a child on the breast of his wife.

********

Anyone who has tried to console a frightened child or a traumatised adult knows that Michael Jayston's performance in that scene was painfully spot-on. If you found the way Nicholas and Alexandra reacted to each other in that scene unbelievable, then odds are that you and your spouse/significant other haven't experienced excruciating loss and I congratulate you. If you found the scene comical or amusing, then perhaps you need to return to pulling wings off butterflies.

RomanovFan318

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Re: Nicholas & Alexandra VHS & DVD
« Reply #298 on: February 18, 2006, 08:06:10 AM »
Quote
I find the music pretty sad.


I do too.  Especially when the music comes on at the end of the movie after the murders.

Although the scene where Nagorny is taken away is the most heartbreaking scene IMO others are:

When Alexei kisses his daddy on the cheek as Yurovsky and hs band of murderers come into the room.

The little girl crying for her mommy after the palace massacre.

NAAOTMA

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Re: Nicholas & Alexandra VHS & DVD
« Reply #299 on: February 18, 2006, 12:52:34 PM »
Janet W has once again written a brilliant post. Among her many insightful points in her post, she mentions the reactions of traumatized people in their reactions to overwhelming emotional pain. From sad personal experience I can second her insight.

As for posters who claim to laugh during the execution on a website that was created to remember the last Imperial Family of Russia, what in the world are you thinking? You will say you are expressing yourself and have a "right" to do that. Your "selfexpression" shows the streak of cruelty that Janet alluded to in her post.

Way back in the early 1970s, the book and film NICHOLAS AND ALEXANDRA was virtually all there was out there for most people interested in the Romanovs. Comparisons with the embarassment of riches in regards to material now available on the Romanovs are hardly fair. Was the film perfect? No, of course not.

I have not seen the film for a very long time, but I will always remember the girls trudging in the mud at the train station, the suite members loyal to them being forced to separate from them. And Nagorny, knowing he is likely going to a terrible fate for defending Alexis, and reminding Nicholas of how to put the leg brace on the little boy before he is taken away.