Author Topic: How Has Lenin Affected You Or Your Families Life ?  (Read 48254 times)

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Offline NAOTMAA Fan

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Re: How Has Lenin Affected You Or Your Families Life ?
« Reply #135 on: February 29, 2008, 03:33:16 PM »
A thug, also known to be someone of vile, ruthless, and irreligious personality. Mostly someone rebellious and does not condone to rules....

I personally detest the man despite his commendable passion and integrity....I cannot help but loath him utterly.
"...I am in Tatiana's room...Olga and Tatiana are here. I am sitting and digging in my nose with my left hand... Olga wanted to slap me but I ran away from her swinish hand..."
-Anastasia Nicholaievna Romanova, May 8th, 1913

Offline LisaDavidson

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Re: How Has Lenin Affected You Or Your Families Life ?
« Reply #136 on: March 10, 2008, 11:37:18 PM »
V.I. Lenin was a great proletarian revolutionary and thinker, continuer of the cause of Marx and Engels, and the leader and teacher of the working people of the entire world. Not since Marx had the proletarian struggle for emancipation given the world a thinker and leader of the working class of Lenin’s stature. He combined scientific genius, political wisdom, and perspicacity with great organizational ability, an iron will, courage, and daring. He had a boundless faith in the creative powers of the popular masses, was close to them, and enjoyed their total confidence, love, and support. All of Lenin’s activity embodied the organic unity between revolutionary theory and practice. As leader and man Lenin possessed a selfless devotion to communist ideals and to the cause of the party and of the working class and a supreme conviction of the righteousness and justice of that cause. He subordinated every fact of his life to the struggle for the emancipation of the toilers from social and national oppression. He loved both his homeland and was a consistent internationalist. Intransigent toward the class enemy, he had a touching concern for comrades. He was highly exacting toward himself and others and was morally pure, simple, and modest.

Concerning my personal life, my family moved from Beirut to the Armenian SSR in circa 1947. My father's side of the family was quite prosperous because my grandfather was a prominent black marketer. My mother's was not nearly as wealthy, but still lived rather comfortably. My father's family fled in trying to flee the authorities went back to Beirut in the early 1970s and then moved to the United States after the war broke out. My mother's side of the family went to the United States in 1980. Although my family sought and lived decent lives, they were dissatisfied at the degree of discrimination that the native-born population held towards the immigrants.

I am so sorry that your family encountered prejudice in the United States. I know of no country on earth that provides immigrants with more economic opportunity than does the United States of America. That doesn't mean that those who avail themselves of these opportunities have it easy, as you have noted. I think over time that most immigrants are able to overcome discrimination and build quality lives.

I cannot say the same for Lenin's USSR. There was significant discrimination against the native populations by the central government. And economic opportunities simply did not exist. However, I can understand how the pain of how one's family is treated might make this system, which seemed so great on paper, attractive to you. At least in the US, you have the freedom to discuss it.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2008, 06:41:42 PM by LisaDavidson »

Offline Zvezda

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Re: How Has Lenin Affected You Or Your Families Life ?
« Reply #137 on: March 11, 2008, 05:05:26 PM »
Quote
I am so sorry that your family encountered prejudice in the United States.
I was talking about Soviet Armenia. Many of those that went there in 1946-48 complained of prejudice among the native born population.

Offline LisaDavidson

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Re: How Has Lenin Affected You Or Your Families Life ?
« Reply #138 on: March 11, 2008, 06:45:51 PM »
Quote
I am so sorry that your family encountered prejudice in the United States.
I was talking about Soviet Armenia. Many of those that went there in 1946-48 complained of prejudice among the native born population.

Thank you for the clarrification. It really shows your views in a much different light. I had the impression that you were very much pro Soviet Union, to the point where you would not even consider any other country to be worthwhile.

However, surely you realize the discrimination against immigrants was very much a part of Bolshevik Russia, much more so than it was ever a part of Tsarist Russia. I know because my own family members who were from Germany and the Baltic States, had a relatively easy time under the Tsars but were forced to run for their lives under the Communists.

Offline Zvezda

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Re: How Has Lenin Affected You Or Your Families Life ?
« Reply #139 on: March 13, 2008, 04:53:02 PM »
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discrimination against immigrants was very much a part of Bolshevik Russia, much more so than it was ever a part of Tsarist Russia.
I do not agree. The 1946-48 wave of immigrants in Soviet Armenia from Syria, Lebanon, and elsewhere were resented by the native-born population because of vast cultural differences. The poor relations between these groups cannot be attributed to the ideology of Communist Party which promoted brotherhood among all nations. While immigrants in Soviet Armenia were resented by the native-born population, many of them still built a successful life in their new country; the president of Armenia from 1991-98 was born in Syria.

Offline LisaDavidson

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Re: How Has Lenin Affected You Or Your Families Life ?
« Reply #140 on: March 13, 2008, 05:22:13 PM »
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discrimination against immigrants was very much a part of Bolshevik Russia, much more so than it was ever a part of Tsarist Russia.
I do not agree. The 1946-48 wave of immigrants in Soviet Armenia from Syria, Lebanon, and elsewhere were resented by the native-born population because of vast cultural differences. The poor relations between these groups cannot be attributed to the ideology of Communist Party which promoted brotherhood among all nations. While immigrants in Soviet Armenia were resented by the native-born population, many of them still built a successful life in their new country; the president of Armenia from 1991-98 was born in Syria.

Thank you for sharing this information.

I realize that Communist ideology promoted brotherhood, but this did not always translate into actual practice in the Soviet Union. It is good to know that, as with immigrants to the United States, there was eventual success in their new lives.

Offline svetlana

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Re: How Has Lenin Affected You Or Your Families Life ?
« Reply #141 on: March 27, 2009, 08:53:18 PM »
New Book Recounts Children’s Forgotten Civil War Odyssey

For 800 children sent on summer vacation to the Urals in 1918, it was meant to be a three-month escape from war-torn St. Petersburg. Known as Petrograd at the time, the city was suffering chronic food shortages.

But as the Russian Civil War raged, it became impossible for the children to return. They began an incredible three-year-long Odyssey around the globe — eventually returning to St. Petersburg the long way around the world via the Russian Far East, Asia, the U.S. and Europe.

The existence of the journey was kept hidden to the Soviet public for a simple reason: the children were rescued by officers from the American Red Cross.

With the arrival of “The Unbelievable Story or The Children’s Ark,” Vladimir Lipovetsky’s novel about these adventures, the story is for the first time reaching a mass audience in Russia. St. Petersburg sailor and journalist Lipovetsky came across the subject by sheer accident on a trip to the U.S. in 1978.

“I researched this mind-blowing story for 25 years, working in archives in New York, San Francisco, Japan, Belgium, Vladivostok and St. Petersburg,” Lipovetsky said. “The characters I describe in the book have become close people to me.”

Lipovetsky wasn’t planning to write the book himself, and appealed to already established cultural figures, from writer Daniil Granin to filmmaker Sergei Gerasimov, but in vain.

“Everybody turned this fascinating story down for the same reason: it would look like pro-American propaganda and will be sure to cause a sour reaction from the Russian government,” the author said.

From Vladivostok the boat, a Japanese cargo boat rented by the Red Cross for the rescue, docked at San Francisco, the Panama Canal, New York, Brest andHelsinki.

The children who made the journey kept their travels a secret. That famous St. Petersburg choreographer Leonid Yakobson was one of them, only came to light after he died, during Lipovetsky’s research.

“They were afraid to mention it and many of these children eventually suffered in some way or another,” said Lyubov Krokhalyova, daughter of Leonid Danilov, who made the journey. “Some of them just weren’t trusted because of this exposure to Western life, some were denied the right to get higher education.”

Lipovetsky said the Russian ballerina Maya Plisetskaya, a friend of Yakobson, was astonished to hear that he had been one of the wandering children.

“She just didn’t believe it at first,” he said. “She said Yakobson would have told her. But we received a written confirmation from Yakobson’s widow that he was there. And it was then already that he demonstrated an ability for dancing: one of my heroes recalls an episode when many girls were dancing on board the Japanese ship, and Lyonya was the only boy to dance.”

The episode was based on Yakobson’s reminisence.

The story began in the spring of 1918, when Petrograd authorities decided to send children from the starving city to safer and warmer places. Eight hundred children, aged between 7 and 15 years old, left for the Urals.

However, by the time they were to return home, White general Alexander Kolchak’s troops blocked the railway in Siberia, making the trip impossible. The children faced a hungry and cold winter.

American Red Cross volunteers working in Siberia found out about the plight of the children, and started plotting a rescue plan. After they discovered that taking the train to St. Petersburg was not an option, they took the bold decision of arranging a detour by sea.

Lipovetsky compares the story to the Arabian Nights.

“You can tell a new episode every night, and there will be no end to the story,” he said.

Lipovetsky wrote his book as a semi-fictional account.

“The writer chose the most difficult genre for his novel,” said Alexei Gordin, head of Azbuka publishing house, which has published the book. “In a documentary you simply list the facts. Writing fiction is more entertaining but fiction is a rather ‘irresponsible’ genre. But in semi-fiction you not only have to stick to historical truth, you need to reconstruct people’s feelings without insulting anybody’s memory.”

Several children died during the journey.

“The first two children, a little brother and sister, died while on the train in Siberia,” Lipovetsky said. “It is difficult to watch over 800 kids, and during a train stop they ran away, ate some poisonous berries and died.”

A girl died after she was bitten by a tropical fly when the boat was crossing the Panama canal. A boy was killed during an accident with a U.S. soldier’s gun.

“There were several deaths but children were dying by hundreds in starvation-stricken Petrograd,” Lipovetsky said.

Upon arrival in Petrograd in 1921, the children and their parents had trouble recognizing each other. One mother looked for a specific birthmark to recognize her son. One girl refused to accept that an emaciated woman was her mother, Lipovetsky said.

Vladimir Pozner, head of the Russian Television Academy, called the book a literary and historical epic of heroism.


My grandmother was among those children. She told me this amazing story. how she made it around the globe. She was 9 then. She described San Francisco streets full of people greeting them.. children from soviet Russia... Grandma told me ...some children were adopted by Americans, it was up to the children, but she said she wanted to go home back to Petrograd. When the ship arrived in Sankt-Peterburg, nobody met her, her parents left to Paris and she was taken to an orphanage but on the way there recognized a blue mail box at the house her aunt lived, so she announced she knows where she lived before, and was dropped there, fortunately it was the house of her relative and they accepted her. My grandma never published or gave any information to anybody except of her family what happened to her in her life. She lived and died in 1986 at Sankt-Petersburg, Russia.
And yes, both of her parents left to Paris without their children in 1917 and never came back. What were they thinking is a mistery, maybe they planned to take the kids later... But yes, because of Mr.Lenin my ancestors lost their family, kids, everything. My grandma saved by the Americans,  gave birth to 3 children, 4 grandchildren, 7 grandgrandchildren. Four of the grandgrandchildren live in USA now.
-Svetlana,
Atlanta USA

Offline Yelena Aleksandrovna

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Re: How Has Lenin Affected You Or Your Families Life ?
« Reply #142 on: May 15, 2009, 08:21:51 PM »
My God!!! He was a devil