Author Topic: The Cambridge/Teck/Fitzgeorge branches  (Read 36862 times)

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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: The Cambridge/Teck/Fitzgeorge branches
« Reply #15 on: May 07, 2006, 10:42:46 AM »




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anabel

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Re: The Cambridge/Teck/Fitzgeorge branches
« Reply #16 on: May 07, 2006, 01:54:17 PM »
Many thanks to grandduchessella for posting these pictures! :-* Please keep them coming!

Now I have one question: Which one of the gentlemen in the last picture posted is Francis? :-/

Offline grandduchessella

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Re: The Cambridge/Teck/Fitzgeorge branches
« Reply #17 on: May 07, 2006, 09:45:09 PM »
Quote
Many thanks to grandduchessella for posting these pictures! :-* Please keep them coming!

Now I have one question: Which one of the gentlemen in the last picture posted is Francis? :-/

He is directly behind his mother, 2nd from right in the back.

Of all the children, he probably looked the most like MA.
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Prince_Christopher

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Re: The Cambridge/Teck/Fitzgeorge branches
« Reply #18 on: May 21, 2006, 06:47:49 PM »
Thanks all for the great pictures.  I enjoy reading about and looking at pictures of the "poorer relations".  

The Tecks were really quite an attractive family....  

alixaannencova

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Re: The Cambridge/Teck/Fitzgeorge branches
« Reply #19 on: June 19, 2007, 03:31:49 AM »
Maybe this should be on the 'Grace and Favour' thread, or perhaps there is an existing thread that I am not finding?

I should love to know more details about White Lodge. I have a few pictures of the interiors from 'The Opulent Eye', but nothing really revealing! My cousin visited it in it's present guise as the RBS and said it is a very pretty building, but he is not a fiend for details like me! I'd love to know if floor plans, layouts and more piccies are out there of the house as occupird by Mary Adelaide and her family.

Personally I love Mary Adelaide and think her such an interesting character! Does she have a thread of her own at all, as I think she deserves one all to herself!

Offline Eddie_uk

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Re: The Cambridge/Teck/Fitzgeorge branches
« Reply #20 on: June 19, 2007, 08:43:12 AM »
Hi alix, if you read Queen Marys biography by James Pope Hennessey, I seem to recall Mary Adelaide gives a very detailed account of some of the rooms, furnishings etc. The Duke apparently had a very good eye for interior design!
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Offline Marlene

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Re: The Cambridge/Teck/Fitzgeorge branches
« Reply #21 on: June 19, 2007, 08:44:27 AM »
http://www.richmond.gov.uk/local_history_white_lodge.pdf

Mary Adelaide has been one of favorites for many years - because  she was truly the first "career" British princess.  Her sister married into the Grand ducal house of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, and her brother, the Duke of Cambridge, was a noted military officer, but married in contravention of the Royal Marriages Act.  Thus, Mary Adelaide was Victoria's only contemporary in the UK in the royal family -- and Mary Adelaide undertook charity works, patronages, etc.,  really beginning the work of a British princess, and she certainly inculcated this sense of duty to her own children (didn't work for Frank though, but especially with her only daughter, Mary.

Mary Adelaide's example of a royal career changed the role of the British princess, I think.  This is evident in Vicky and Alice's roles in their respective homes in Germany, and certainly with Helena, who took on a lot of duties (she was active as a supporter of the nursing profession, but was unable to study nursing.)

Princess Mary Adelaide was known as the People's Princess (long before Blair co-opted the title for his own use), and this is the title of a biography of Mary Adelaide published several decades ago.  In the early 1900s, a 2 volume bio was published which included extracts from her diaries and letters.
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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: The Cambridge/Teck/Fitzgeorge branches
« Reply #22 on: June 19, 2007, 01:04:18 PM »
I should love to know more details about White Lodge. I have a few pictures of the interiors from 'The Opulent Eye', but nothing really revealing! My cousin visited it in it's present guise as the RBS and said it is a very pretty building, but he is not a fiend for details like me! I'd love to know if floor plans, layouts and more piccies are out there of the house as occupird by Mary Adelaide and her family.


From wikipedia on White Lodge:

"White Lodge is a Georgian house situated in Richmond Park, on the outskirts of London. Today, it houses the Royal Ballet Lower School, catering for students aged 11-16.

The house was built as a hunting lodge for George II, by the architect Roger Morris, shortly after his accession to the throne in 1727. Originally called Stone Lodge, the house was renamed New Lodge shortly afterwards to distinguish itself from a neighbouring lodge.

Queen Caroline, consort of George II, stayed at the lodge frequently. On her death in 1737, the lodge passed to Robert Walpole, 1st Baron Walpole, the son of the Prime Minister. After his death, it came to Queen Caroline's daughter, Princess Amelia, in 1751. The Princess, who also became the ranger of Richmond Park, closed the entire park to the public, except to distinguished friends and those with permits, sparking public outrage. In 1758, a court case made by a local brewer against a park gatekeeper eventually overturned the Princess's order, and the park was once again opened to the public. Princess Amelia Sophia is remembered for adding the two white wings to the main lodge, which remain to this day. The Prime Minister, the 3rd Earl of Bute, became ranger after the Princess's death, and lived at the Lodge from 1761 until his death in 1792. It was during this tenure that the name White Lodge first appeared, in the journal of Lady Mary Coke. According to her journal, Lady Mary went to Richmond Park hoping to catch a glimpse of "their Majestys" (George III and Queen Charlotte), who did "always stay at White Lodge on a Sunday".

After restoration of the house following disrepair in the late 1700's, George III gave the house to another Prime Minister, Henry Addington, 1st Viscount Sidmouth, who enclosed the lodge's first private gardens in 1805. Although the King (affectionately called Farmer George for his enthusiasm for farming and gardening) made himself ranger, Lord Sidmouth was made deputy ranger. Among the more famous visitors to White Lodge during this period was Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson, in the month before the Battle of Trafalgar. He is said to have explained his battle plan to Lord Sidmouth by drawing lines on the table with a wine-moistened finger.

After the Viscount Sidmouth died in 1844, Queen Victoria gave the house to her aunt – the last surviving daughter of George III – Princess Mary, Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh. After her death in 1857, Prince Albert, needing a secluded location to bring his son the Prince of Wales, the future Edward VII of the United Kingdom, during his education, decided on White Lodge. Although the Prince of Wales favoured stimulating company to hard study, Prince Albert kept him here in seclusion, with only five companions, two of whom were tutors. Understandably, the Prince of Wales found the few years at White Lodge boring. After the Prince of Wales was sent to Ireland to continue his training, Queen Victoria, desperately grieving after the death of her mother, the Duchess of Kent, came to White Lodge with Prince Albert, in the early months of 1861.

The next occupants of the Lodge were the Duke and Duchess of Teck, who were given use of the house by the mourning queen Victoria in 1869. Princess Mary Adelaide, a granddaughter of George III and therefore first cousin to the queen, was famous for her extravagance. Requests for a higher income from the queen were unsuccessful. Debts were increasing, and the family fled abroad during the 1880s to escape their creditors.....In 1894, the duchess of York gave birth to her first child, the future Edward VIII, at White Lodge. Queen Victoria visited the Lodge to see the Prince shortly afterwards. Three years later, the Duchess of Teck died, followed by the Duke of Teck in 1900.

After queen Victoria's death, the Lodge was owned privately by a Ms Hartman, who was bankrupted in 1909 as a result of maintaining the property. The house returned to royal use in 1923, during the honeymoon of Prince Albert, Duke of York, the future George VI and the Duchess of York. Queen Mary, who had stayed at White Lodge with her mother, Princess Mary Adelaide, insisted that they make their home at the Lodge. However, due to the vast number of sightseers, there was an extreme lack of privacy. The house was also in an inconvenient location, and the maintenance was costly. The couple vacated the property soon afterwards.

From then, the house was occupied by various private residents, including Arthur Lee, 1st Viscount Lee of Fareham. The last private resident was a Colonel James Veitch, who lived at White Lodge until 1954. In 1955, the Royal Ballet School took over the premises, and continue to have use of it today.
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Eric_Lowe

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Re: The Cambridge/Teck/Fitzgeorge branches
« Reply #23 on: June 26, 2007, 07:58:37 PM »
I heard Prince Paul & Princess Olga of Yugoslavia (sister of Marina of Kent) also lived in White Lodge for a while.  ???

alixaannencova

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Re: The Cambridge/Teck/Fitzgeorge branches
« Reply #24 on: July 17, 2007, 07:57:10 AM »
Does anyone have piccies and data relating to Cambridge Cottage, Kew during it's tenure as the principal residence of George Cambridge and his Papa. The official website is croc in my opinion as is the HRPP site on the house.

It looks charming and somewhat modest! Any guidance would be very much appreciated!

As a side line.....just out of curiosity can anyone confirm whether Mrs Jane Scrivener neé Lane really is the last living grea great grandchild of George III and Queen Charlotte. I often wondered what the Fitzgeorges did with their portion of the 2nd Duke's personal estate, and how much they actually got. They seem to have been a very discreet and well behaved lot from what I can tell, and assume that Queen Mary must have maintained a semblance of support/contact with them. At least I jolly well hope she did! But from what I can gather the family never seemed to put down roots so to speak. No permanent family seat or the like!
« Last Edit: July 17, 2007, 08:00:19 AM by alixaannencova »

Offline grandduchessella

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Re: The Cambridge/Teck/Fitzgeorge branches
« Reply #25 on: July 17, 2007, 12:30:46 PM »
As a side line.....just out of curiosity can anyone confirm whether Mrs Jane Scrivener neé Lane really is the last living grea great grandchild of George III and Queen Charlotte. 

She's a great-great-great-grandchild, isn't she?

George III--Duke of Cambridge---Duke of Cambridge (George)---Adolphus Fitzgeorge---Olga Fitzgeorge Lane---Jane Lane, b.1919
                    (son)                       (grandson)                       (great-grandson)        (g-great-grandchild)   (g-g-great-grandchild)
« Last Edit: July 17, 2007, 12:32:28 PM by grandduchessella »
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ashdean

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Re: The Cambridge/Teck/Fitzgeorge branches
« Reply #26 on: July 17, 2007, 12:40:37 PM »
One of the Fitzgeorges became a actual Princess...Mabel married the widower Prince Vladimir Galitzine ( whose first wife nee Countess Katia Carlow was a morganatic daughter of Duke George of Mecklenburg Strelitz).It was a second marriage for both and without issue.

alixaannencova

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Re: The Cambridge/Teck/Fitzgeorge branches
« Reply #27 on: July 17, 2007, 12:57:02 PM »
Thank you Granduchessella for clarifying that one! Does that mean Alice Athlone was the last surviving great great grand child!

Offline grandduchessella

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Re: The Cambridge/Teck/Fitzgeorge branches
« Reply #28 on: July 17, 2007, 02:07:50 PM »
They seem to have been a very discreet and well behaved lot from what I can tell, and assume that Queen Mary must have maintained a semblance of support/contact with them. At least I jolly well hope she did! But from what I can gather the family never seemed to put down roots so to speak. No permanent family seat or the like!

They were frequently mentioned in the Court Circular throughout the reigns of Queen Victoria, King Edward and King George. The relationship might not have been an apparent one to the general public, but the family was not unknown to their various relations. His youngest son, Col Augustus Charles Frederick (A.C.F.) Fitzgeorge was often in attendance, as aide-de-camp or equerry and later Private Secretary, to his father when the Duke was carrying out official duties. His sons, at least Adolphus and Augustus, would also accompany him on his regular visits to Cannes. Every once in awhile, the Court Circular would note that the Duke was 'seen off' by Mrs Fitzgeorge. In King Edward's first round of 'order granting', in February 1901, he made Rear-Admiral Adolphus Fitzgeorge a Commander of the Royal Victorian Order and the Order of the Bath. Grand Duchess Augusta of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (born Augusta of Cambridge) would often visit her old home at Cambridge-Cottage when she returned to England for visits. Her Fitzgeorge nephews usually greeted her and saw her back off. They also seem to have been close to their Saxe-Weimar relations who lived in England.

The family was acknowledged as such in the coverage of the Duke's death. (Though the huge obituary had just 1 little paragraph, the last one at that, stating his marriage and children.)The papers also noted that, due to the marital situation, the Dukedom was now extinct. All 3 of his sons, and his granddaughter Olga Hamilton, were present at his deathbed. Edward and Alexandra, and George and May, as well as other Teck relations, all paid visits to the family afterwards. The family was very public during the funeral, regardless of the various royalties involved. However, they weren't to take their rightful roles, at least in public, as chief mourners--that was left to King Edward and the other royals. The Fitzgeorge's seem to have carved out very successful and popular careers in their respective services.

The private lives weren't always as successful. In 1903, a few years before his death, George Jr ended up in debtor's court. He received a pension (as a retired colonel) and an allowance 'from his father' (the paper, of course, didn't indicate who that father was) of several hundreds pounds, but lived slightly above his means which, in and of itself wouldn't have been disastrous, but he was also involved in financial investments in companies that went bankrupt.  He also suffered from some paralysis around this period. Adolphus, just several weeks later, was the victim of a bizarre death threat (the person threatened to shoot him dead) and the man was later arrested.

George's granddaughter Olga Fitzgeorge (Adolphus's daughter) divorced her husband Charles Hamilton, after about 5 years of marriage, in 1902. That garnered some press attention. (It was on grounds of his infidelity & desertion and was uncontested. The papers didn't mention her royal relation.) Olga had one son from this marriage, who was born in 1898, and at whose baptism King George and Queen Mary attended in person as sponsors. He died in action as a Lieutenant in the Grenadier Guards in Flanders in 1918. (In 1924, Sir Archibald became a Muslim and took the name Abdullah.) Olga was also named, around 1907, in a divorce case as having commited adultery with a married man. She had to file an affidavit with the court. She denied the charges and they do seem to have been without basis. It was rather ugly though, with charges that she'd fled the country, going to Jamaica with her 2nd husband, to avoid questioning. In reality, he'd had business there and she claimed no prior knowledge that her presence would be required in court.

George's granddaughter, Iris Fitzgeorge, (according to the Online Gotha she went by her middle name) married Pr Vladimir Galitzine in 1945 when she was almost 60. She had previously been married to Robert Shekelton Balfour for about 30 years, until his death in 1942. She had issue from this prior marriage.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2007, 02:30:55 PM by grandduchessella »
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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: The Cambridge/Teck/Fitzgeorge branches
« Reply #29 on: July 17, 2007, 02:18:24 PM »
The Duke of Cambridge left over GBP 120,000 at the time of his death. He gave certain bequests of royal memorabilia to his sister Augusta and to Mary Adelaide's daughter, the future Queen Mary. These included some portraits. There were also smaller bequests to long-time servants and other relations. The bulk of his estate was divided by Adolphus and Augustus. George Jr (with the financial problems) wasn't mentioned--had there been a falling-out between the two? There had also been a trust set up upon the death of the Duchess of Cambridge. Upon the deaths of the last of the 3 children (this would've been Augusta some years later) the trust would go to the Duke's children. There was also money left to them by their mother. The tax on this seems to have been deferred until the Duke's death.

After the Duke's death, the papers were less reticent about mentioning the relationship, noting, for instance, when Adolphus succeeded his father (the relationship stated) as patron of a hospice.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2007, 02:21:17 PM by grandduchessella »
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