Author Topic: Queen Anne (of Denmark) and Catholicism  (Read 4381 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Bernardino

  • Boyar
  • **
  • Posts: 205
  • Real, Real, Real, por El-Rei de Portugal!
    • View Profile
Queen Anne (of Denmark) and Catholicism
« on: May 21, 2006, 05:24:19 PM »
Hello  :)

Can anyone give info on Queen Anne, consort of King James VI of Scots, later on King of England, and her conversion to the Catholic Faith?

Thank you in advance

Offline Prince_Lieven

  • Moderator
  • Velikye Knyaz
  • *****
  • Posts: 6570
  • To Be Useful In All That I Do
    • View Profile
    • Edward III's Descendants
Re: Queen Anne (of Denmark) and Catholicism
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2006, 05:56:55 PM »
Hi Bernardino. I can't seem to find that much info about her conversion, but this is what I did find - after her Lutheran chaplain, Johan Sering, converted to Calvinism, she was left in a difficult position, because Calvinism did not appeal to her. Some of her close friends (e.g Lord and Lady Livingstone, and Henriette Stuart, Countess of Huntly) were Catholics, and with their encouragement she begn to take Catholic instruction in 1600. James was well aware of her conversion, and did not stop her attending Catholic Mass, but insisted she kept the whole thing secret. He was afraid that a Catholic queen would endanger his chances of succeeding Elizabeth. It's not much I know, but I hope it helps.
"How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?"
-Sherlock Holmes

"Men forget, but never forgive; women forgive, but never forget."

Offline Bernardino

  • Boyar
  • **
  • Posts: 205
  • Real, Real, Real, por El-Rei de Portugal!
    • View Profile
Re: Queen Anne (of Denmark) and Catholicism
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2006, 06:03:16 PM »
Hi Prince Lieven I'm glad I'm talking with you  :)

When I first knew I was amazed how the protestant nobility which caused so many troubles to the Catholic mother of James I (and vice-versa, no innocents here) could have accepted the conversion of Queen Anne...surely they would expect: catholic -> protestant, and not the movement protestant -> catholic....

After all there was some tolerance...or maybe when they knew it was too late...

Well, I believe by then King James was far more confortable on the throne of Alba then his mama ever was... ::)

Offline Prince_Lieven

  • Moderator
  • Velikye Knyaz
  • *****
  • Posts: 6570
  • To Be Useful In All That I Do
    • View Profile
    • Edward III's Descendants
Re: Queen Anne (of Denmark) and Catholicism
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2006, 11:30:28 AM »
Well, one of James's provisos was that the whole thing was kept extremely secret - I wonder if Charles I, such a devout Anglican, knew his mother was a Catholic.
"How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?"
-Sherlock Holmes

"Men forget, but never forgive; women forgive, but never forget."

Offline bell_the_cat

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1678
  • I am he, who will bell the cat
    • View Profile
Re: Queen Anne (of Denmark) and Catholicism
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2006, 04:01:20 AM »
Yes, of course he did! He himsel was looking for a catholic wife less than three years after his mother's death. He never had any problems with H M's catholicism (which was fairly public - she had her own chapel built next to St James's Park. It obviously bothered him when he was facing death that she might try to convert his children though!

It was only in 1700 that it became impossible for am English monarch to be married to a catholic. Interestingly even Elizabeth dallied with the idea of marrying the Catholic Duc d'Anjou in the 1580s. Mary II was the first Protestant Queen since Elizabeth.



« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by bell_the_cat »
Never put off until tomorrow what you can put off until the day after tomorrow. (Mark Twain)

Offline Prince_Lieven

  • Moderator
  • Velikye Knyaz
  • *****
  • Posts: 6570
  • To Be Useful In All That I Do
    • View Profile
    • Edward III's Descendants
Re: Queen Anne (of Denmark) and Catholicism
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2006, 09:55:19 AM »
Just a few things I found out about Queen Anne of Denmark in 'After Elizabeth'.

According to the Duc de Sully, Anne's character was 'quite the reverse of her husband's; she was naturally bold and enterprising; she loved pomp and gradeur, tumult and intrigue.'

James often referred to her as 'my dearest bedfellow' or 'my Annie' though she preferred to call herself Anna. She certainly wasn't afraid to stand up to James - after a spat with the Ruthven family, he threw three Ruthven ladies out of Falkland Palace into the rain, despite Anne's protests. She warned him not to treat her the same way, since she wasn't the Earl of Gowrie (one of the Ruthvens). James put down such things as pregnancy induced mood swings, and took not action. He was lenient again when it was discovered that Anne was secretly meeting with one of the Ruthven sisters, and giving her money. Some wanted Anne arrested, but again James defended her.
"How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?"
-Sherlock Holmes

"Men forget, but never forgive; women forgive, but never forget."

Offline Zanthia

  • Boyar
  • **
  • Posts: 215
  • "She always made other women look common"
    • View Profile
Re: Queen Anne (of Denmark) and Catholicism
« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2006, 01:54:17 AM »
Anne was born oct. 14, 1574 at Skanderborg Castle in Denmark, daughter of King Frederik II and Queen Sophia. She had just turned 15 when she was married to James in Oslo, Norway, on nov. 23 in 1589. They were close friends in the beginning of their marriage, that must have helped her to overcome the homesickness she must have felt when she first came to Scotland without knowing anyone. She was extravagant and her expansion of her London residence, Somerset House, (which she renamed Denmark House), was causing problems for her husband. The people and the parlament grumbled over the huge amounts of money she spendend. Anne definetly was better to navigate in the poisonous court than James was. They had eight children, but only Henry, Elizabeth and Charles survived infancy. Then there was a number of miscarriages and stillbirths. She died at Hampton Court Palace on March 4, 1619, only 44 years old.

Of Alix: "I was raised in an age of beautiful women, and the two most beautiful was the Empress Elisabeth of Austria and my own mother"  George V

"We've invited all the beautiful women we know, but the Princess of Wales in the most beautiful of them all"  Bertie