Author Topic: King Edward VII  (Read 67685 times)

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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: King Edward VII
« Reply #105 on: March 18, 2013, 09:54:41 AM »
I think there was a combination of factors:

1) she didn't think he was all that bright--certainly not on the level of Albert or the Princess Royal--and didn't trust him to a large extent with matters of State (she did give him more and more social & representational duties as he got older though)

2) the traditional Hanoverian discord between monarch and heir--I read in one bio that Edward VII was determined not to repeat this with his heir and once he became King brought George in to a large extent

3) the conscious and unconscious antipathy she bore him after the death of Albert and the blame she laid at his feet for dragging his father off to Ireland over the Nellie Clifton (?) affair

4) her own mercurial personality which caused her to fluctuate her opinion on all of her children save Beatrice and, perhaps, Arthur

He did undertake a number of official duties starting really in the late '70s/early '80s as she refused to have anything to do with ceremonial duties. He was often the representative to coronations, funerals, weddings, etc...He stood in her stead, along with Alexandra, in a number of balls and dinners around the time of the Jubilees as well. It seems that it was only the 'red boxes' that were totally off limits to him by the later part of her reign.
They also serve who only stand and wait--John Milton
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Offline CountessKate

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Re: King Edward VII
« Reply #106 on: March 18, 2013, 09:46:07 PM »
I agree with all the above, and would just add that Albert's attitudes towards his eldest son seemed particularly significant in setting the tone of the relationship with both parents which Victoria carried with her into her widowhood.  Although Bertie's intellectual abilities compared poorly with his elder sister Vicky's, it was really Albert who really felt the deep exasperation and frustration with his son's failure to meet that standard, since Victoria, in her letters to Vicky, clearly indicated she was not in favour of over-educating children.  It is also open to question whether Victoria would have found the news of her son's first sexual encounter a matter of quite such hysteria as Albert did.  It was Albert who really wrote Bertie off as dim and frivolous and there was perhaps some unconscious jealousy there - once the Prince of Wales was old enough for his own establishment, Albert would never be able to exercise sovereign authority over his son, except via his wife.  At any rate, Albert's views seemed to validate Victoria's desire to keep a tight grip on political power though not of course the social and representative duties which she disliked.

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: King Edward VII
« Reply #107 on: March 19, 2013, 04:20:44 AM »
A thought has come into my head on reading the previous post. Given that albert married at 20, is it possible that victoria was his only sexual partner, and could that be part of the  explanation for Albert's horror at his son's fling with Nellie Cliften. Plus Albert's father and elder brother were both notorious womanisers.

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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: King Edward VII
« Reply #108 on: March 19, 2013, 08:44:49 AM »
I wouldn't be surprised if he was. The marriage had been talked about since 1836 (when he was 17) and he had a strong moral code. Plus, I always had the impression he was really horrified, I don't know if traumatized is too strong, by the marriage of his parents with its dual adultery and the disappearance of their mother from their lives. He was definitely repulsed by his brother's actions. Queen Victoria said that Bertie sadly recalled her own Hanoverian ancestry with its licentiousness and sexual promiscuity--even though she had a strong sexual drive herself, she at least confined it to marriage!
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Re: King Edward VII
« Reply #109 on: March 19, 2013, 10:35:29 AM »
I can't help but think that would've been very different had Bertie been a woman.

He seems to be the only one of Victoria and Albert's children with this type of...appetite. Does that seem to be the case for anyone else?

Offline grandduchessella

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Re: King Edward VII
« Reply #110 on: March 19, 2013, 10:51:50 AM »
There were some rumors of his sister Louise's sensual appetites. I don't think anyone in the family approached Bertie's level of promiscuity though! (Though Alfred cut quite a swath.) Arthur wasn't the paragon of virtue that QV painted him to be but he was faithful for the most part--emotional relationships with women like Leonie Leslie nonwithstanding. He quite shocked his mother though with how eager he was to be 'alone' with Louise Margaret before they married though. Vicky seemed to have a very healthy relationship with Fritz but only with him--her interest in that aspect of life seemed to die with him. Louise definitely had a more sensual nature than the other sisters though.
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Ian (UK)

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Re: King Edward VII
« Reply #111 on: October 14, 2013, 07:03:38 AM »
LILLIE LANGTRY MISTRESS OF EDWARD VII
A link by Lillielangtry.com     http://www.lillielangtry.com/

THE HOMES OF LILLIE LANGTRY

Langtry Manor, Bournemouth.


21 Pont Street, London. Now the Cadogan Hotel.


8 Wilton Place, London.