Author Topic: Succession Laws  (Read 12391 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline nerdycool

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 675
    • View Profile
Succession Laws
« on: February 25, 2004, 07:33:43 PM »
I do not know a great deal about these laws and just want to ask some questions to those who do...

How hard would it be to reverse this law? Is it kind of like a Constitutional amendment - relatively easy to put in, but almost impossible to take back out?

I'd read somewhere that for the head of the family (whoever that may be) to change this law, it wouldn't be accepted unless they made this change retroactively and "de-morganaticized" the marriages of those whose marriages were considered unequal. Would this create even more problems should this ever occur? More specifically, what types of problems?

And my last question is what is the difference between dynastic head and head of family? For example, Nicholas Romanovich calls himself Head of the Romanov Family, yet he's married to a countess...noble but not royal. If a compromise were made and noble marriages were allowed, he could be recognized as the head of the family by all branches. Somewhere in the mix is the dynastic head of the family. Would a different member of the Romanov family be able to claim the dynastic position, but not be the head of the family?

I know that the members of the family have disputes over these laws and that something should be worked out between the branches so everyone is happy. I can only hope that it is soon...

thanks a bunch!!!

Offline Nick_Nicholson

  • Boyar
  • **
  • Posts: 199
  • www.objectofvirtue.com
    • View Profile
    • Nicholas B. A. Nicholson
Re: Succession Laws
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2004, 09:01:35 PM »
Dear Nerdycool --

Lot's of questions which are hard to answer.

If you believe in the rights and privledges of Imperial rule, the only person who can ammend the Fundamental Laws is the Emperor (or Empress) with the consent of the Duma.  Since there is no crowned and annointed Emperor or Empress, that point is moot,  and since there is dispute over who is head of the House, there is an additional problem.

Nicholas Romanovitch is the head of the Romanov Family Association, which is a group of descendants of Romanov family members who contracted morganatic marriages.  Every descendant of the Romanovs who survived the revolution is a member of this family EXCEPT Maria Vladimirovna, George Mikhailovitch, Leonida Georgievna,and the Illynsky family.  If you don't count the Illynskys, I believe that Nicholas Romanovitch is the seniormost male descendant living (morganatic birth aside.)  The RFA believes that the marriage between Vladimir Kirillovitch and Leonida Georgievna was also morganatic, and as a result, Maria Vladimirovna is no more a dynast than the rest of the descendants now living.

For a family reunification, Maria Vladimirovna says that the rest of the descendants must acknowledge their morganatic status, and use the titles granded by her father (Princes Romanovsky-Krassinsky, etc.).  Nicholas maintians that no Romanov descendant qualifies by the old statutes to assume the throne, and therefore they are all equal, and the choice is up to Russia and the Russians to decide (which is what the last Tsar, Mikhail Alexandrovitch said in his abdication).

I doubt this will ever be worked out.  Someone once said that the most unique quality of the Romanov family was that they were capable of arguing with each other in six languages.

best,  nick
Nick Nicholson
New York City

Offline Annie

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 4756
    • View Profile
    • Anna Anderson Exposed!
Re: Succession Laws
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2004, 08:34:54 PM »
Very interesting post Nick, I don't know how I missed this thread before!

Here is a site I found on the 'family fued'

http://www.antipas.org/news/russia/czar/family_fued.html

What is a "curatix", did the Vladimirovichi invent that word like they invented all those phoney last names to downgrade their family members?

When Maria Vladimirovna's parents failed to have a son, her father declared her "Curatrix" of the Russian throne so that the claim could pass through her to her son. Under Romanov tradition the throne passed along only male bloodlines

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Annie »

Offline nerdycool

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 675
    • View Profile
Re: Succession Laws
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2004, 01:00:03 AM »
Quote
What is a "curatix", did the Vladimirovichi invent that word like they invented all those phoney last names to downgrade their family members?

When Maria Vladimirovna's parents failed to have a son, her father declared her "Curatrix" of the Russian throne so that the claim could pass through her to her son. Under Romanov tradition the throne passed along only male bloodlines


curatrix
\Cu*ra"trix\ (-tr?ks), n. [L.]
1. A woman who cures.
2. A woman who is a guardian or custodian.

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary

No, they did not make that word up.

David_Pritchard

  • Guest
Re: Succession Laws
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2006, 10:25:51 PM »
Below is a link to an interesting article on the Russian succession during the 18th century, in pdf file form:

http://www.ceeol.com/aspx/getdocument.aspx?logid=5&id=e4f051f9-d919-4465-a82b-46ed50f0505b

DAP


Offline Nadezhda Edvardovna

  • Boyar
  • **
  • Posts: 118
    • View Profile
Re: Succession Laws
« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2006, 02:26:43 PM »
I recall reading somewhere that when rhetorically backed into a corner, Empress Marie said that in the event of a restoration, the choice of a new Tsar would belong to the Russian people.

There isn't anyone qualified under the old laws to succeed to a restored throne.  Under the old laws, a potential heir disqualifies him/herself by doing any one of the following three:

1. Marrying without permission of the Tsar
2. Marrying unequally (a person of lesser rank)
3. Marrying outside the Church's laws.

Moreover, while a grand duke could marry outside the faith and keep his place in the list, if his wife did not convert to Orthodoxy before the birth of children, those children would be excluded from "the list."

Elsewhere, people have said that the Vladimirovichi have the strongest claim. But I believe their claims are invalid under the old laws, and spring from violations committed *prior* to 1917.

Grand Duchess Vladimir (Miechen) converted to Orthodoxy after Grand Duke Kyrill was born. Thus, he was *born* ineligible, as would be all his descendants.

Moreover, he married Victoria of Saxe-Coburg (Ducky) without the permission of  Nicholas II and without a church dispensation (necessary, as he and Ducky were first cousins and therefore within forbidden bounds of consanguinity). Adding to that, she was a divorcee whose ex was still alive. So even if *he* were eligible, his children would not.

I've gone over the family tree carefully, and it seems that there isn't anyone left who is qualified by the old rules.  However, it is reasonable to think that the old rules don't apply anymore.  

In the Time of Troubles (1601-1613), Russia was afflicted with multiple claimants to the throne as well as plenty of criticism of the relative legitimacy of the then-current holder's claim (three false Dimitris, Tsar Feodor II, Tsar Vasily Shuyskiy, Tsar Ladislaus IV of Poland). All this in addition to crop failure, disease, famine, and suffering.  [Not unlike the last 105 years, I think. Economic catastrophe, political instability, wars and rumors of wars....] The resolution came about when the Russian people, in the form of the Zemsky Sobor, selected Michael Romanov.  

Given the stated will of the last person with any clear authority on the subject and the historic precedent, if there's to be a restoration, there should be a new Zemsky Sobor and a new selection.  For myself, I would be more interested in selecting a candidate who'd lived in Russia all his/her life over any of the Romanov diaspora.  Someone who'd lived in Russia during all this turmoil would be more attuned to the needs, wishes, hopes and wants of Russia.  It is the lack of such understanding which doomed the last Russian monarch.

Pax, Nadezhda.

David_Pritchard

  • Guest
Re: Succession Laws
« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2006, 03:26:23 PM »
These are very old questions that you have stated; I have answered your comments about the Vladimirovichi below:

Conversion for the wife before marriage only applied to the Emperor and the heir apparant, not all heirs in the line of succession. Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna the Elder did convert to Orthodoxy, she was granted the title of Orthodox Grand Duchess and here children were included in the official line of succession by the Head of the Imperial House, Emperor Nicholas II. This historical fact renders your points of discussion moot.

The Emperor himself resolved any legal issues concerning the children and grand children of Grand Duke Vladimir Aleksandrovich and Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna the Elder long before the Revolution of 1917. The Emperor was the arbiter of the Fundemental Law there was no court to debate the issues.

Again concering consanguinity, the Emperor was the Head of the Russian Orthodox Church prior to the restoration of the Moscow Patriarchate. He approved the marriage, therefore it was valid. Orthodoxy allows each person to have three marriages. They do not adhere to the canons of the Catholics that do not allow for remarrriage without the fromer spouses death.

I am amazed that these same questions appear over and over and over again. Has no one read the Fundemental Law or any of the previous discussions on this issue?

David

Offline Nadezhda Edvardovna

  • Boyar
  • **
  • Posts: 118
    • View Profile
Re: Succession Laws
« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2006, 05:54:47 PM »
David, I suspect that you are a lawyer or of the legal turn of mind, for you clearly remember fine points of laws which are over a century old and were rendered obsolete by the revolution.  Even the most ardent fans of this site couldn't recall everything they'd read. And some of us are new to the topic, and therefore less well-informed than yourself.

So, if I've understood your correction properly, you say that the succession claims of the Vladimirovichi are valid under the old laws.  Were this the case, it seems that when pushed to make a statement on the matter the Dowager Empress would have supported Kyrill's claim. But she did not, and surely as an anointed empress, her opinion would carry greater weight than anybody's.

I suppose one might answer back that she never truly accepted the deaths of her sons and grandson, but if that were the case, why would she have said that it was the decision of the Russian people as to the next tsar?  

Thank you for providing information.  I hope that the next time you have the privilege of sharing your knowledge, you will be less rude and impatient with the ignorance of others.  After all, we are here to learn, are we not?

Pax, Nadezhda

David_Pritchard

  • Guest
Re: Succession Laws
« Reply #8 on: January 28, 2006, 06:20:07 PM »
If you were to send me your e-mail address in a PM, I can send you a copy of the 1906 Fundemental Law in a word document. From you name, I assume that you are Russian, the document is in Russian.

While the Dowager Empress had preceedence among women in Russia, the moment of the death of Emperor Mikhail II, Grand Duke Kyril became the Head of the Imperial House by law. The opinions of the Dowager Empress should they have been positive or negative were of no actual legal relevance, though a good word toward Grand Duke Kyril would certainly have been appreciated for family solidarity.

David
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by David_Pritchard »

David_Pritchard

  • Guest
Re: Succession Laws
« Reply #9 on: March 06, 2006, 08:16:41 PM »
Les Romanoff et leurs mariages après 1917

par Stanislaw Dumin, A.I.G. (Russie, Moscou)

I


Les « Lois fondamentales » de l’Empire de Russie ne reconnaissent comme membres de la Maison Impériale de Russie (plus loin : MIR) que les personnes de sang impérial, issues d’une union autorisée par le Chef de la MIR avec « une personne de sang égal » ; c’est-à-dire, nées de mariage égal (dynastique) les descendants mâles de la dynastie, autorisés officiellement par le Chef de la MIR. En vertu du décret de l’empereur Nicolas I, le 6.12.1852, la descendance masculine de sa fille Grande-Duchesse Marie Nikolaievna, de son mariage avec le duc Maximilien de Leuchtenberg a aussi reçu les droits des Princes et des Princesses de sang avec le titre des Princes Romanovski et le prédicat d’Altesse Impériale. Et dans le cas d’extinction de la dernière lignée masculine légitime de la dynastie, la succession « restera dans la même famille, mais dans la lignée féminine », la plus proche au dernier Chef de la MIR.

D’après l’article 36 des « Lois fondamentales », « Les enfants issus de l’union d’un membre de la Famille Impériale avec une personne n’ayant pas un rang correspondant, c’est-à-dire n’appartenant pas à aucune famille régnante ou possessionnée, n’ont pas le droit de succession au trône ». L’article 188 des « Lois fondamentales » (dans le « Statut de la Famille Impériale ») souligne encore une fois, que « Le membre de la Famille Impériale qui a contracté mariage avec une personne dépourvue de rang correspondant, c’est-à-dire qui n’appartient à aucune maison régnante ou possessionnée, ne peut transmettre ni à cette personne ni à la descendance possible, les droits qui appartiennent aux membres de la Famille Impériale ». L’annotation à l’article 188 introduit par l’empereur Alexandre III en 1889, a interdit les mariages non-dynastiques à tous les membres de la MIR. Le mariage d’un membre de la MIR contracté sans permission ou, au moins, sans confirmation du Chef de la MIR, même le mariage d’Église, n’est pas considéré comme légal (voir article 183), et les enfants sont considérés par les lois impériales russes comme des bâtards.

En 1911 sur l’ordre de Nicolas II a été organisé une conférence des Grands-Ducs pour étudier la possibilité de mariages non-dynastiques pour les membres cadets de la MIR, les arrière-petits-fils et les descendants plus éloignés des empereurs, qui portent le titre de Princes de sang impérial. On a discuté aussi la question des noms de famille et des titres des épouses morganatiques et de leurs descendants, c’est-à-dire des personnes qui n’appartiennent plus à la dynastie, mais sont alliées (notamment, les Grands-Ducs ont considéré inacceptable d’employer pour les descendants morganatiques le nom de famille des Romanoff). En vertu du décret de Nicolas II en 1911 dans le supplément à l’article188 les mariages inégaux restent complètement interdits seulement pour les Grands-Ducs et les Grandes-Duchesses (mais souvent leurs mariages morganatiques ont été aussi reconnus plus tard par le Chef de la MIR, et parfois, comme, par exemple, celui de la sœur de l’empereur, la Grande-Duchesse Olga Alexandrovna avec le colonel Nicolas Koulikovski, ancien aide de camp du prince d’Oldenbourg, son premier mari, qui a été contracté sans permission officielle). C’est-à-dire les cadets, les Princes du sang impérial, dont le droit de succession était peu probable à réaliser, ont reçu la possibilité de contracter des mariages pas seulement avec les personnes possédant le rang dynastique. Mais l’article 188, ainsi que l’article 36 des « Lois fondamentales » ont conservé les mêmes formules juridiques très claires d’après lesquelles, ni épouses morganatiques des membres de la dynastie, ni leurs descendants de ces mariages n’appartiennent à la Maison Impériale. Parfois ces épouses et leurs enfants, ainsi que les bâtards des Romanoff ont reçu les droits de la noblesse et les noms de famille spécialement créés (Brassov, Iskander, etc.), et même les titres russes (comtes Belevski-Joukovski, princes Paley) ou étrangers (par exemple, les comtes de Torby, dont le titre a été accordé au Luxembourg, descendants du Grand-Duc Mikhail Mikhaïlovitch marié sans permission impériale à la comtesse Merenberg, petite-fille du grand poète Pouchkine, et exilé de Russie).

L’abdication de Nicolas II le 2 mars 1917 a ébranlé non seulement les fondements de l’Empire, mais aussi celui de la Maison des Romanoff, et on peut remarquer très vite les changements dans leurs affaires matrimoniales. Très vite après l’abdication, en avril 1917, le Prince Gabriel Constantinovitch a contracté un mariage morganatique avec une danseuse Antonine Nesterovska, son cousin Prince Alexandre Romanovski, duc de Leuchtenberg, avec une actrice Natalie Caralli. Le même mois la Princesse Nadejda Petrovna se maria avec le Prince Nicolas Orloff, mais ce dernier mariage, bien qu’aussi « inégal », a été quand même aristocratique. Le Prince Gabriel a annoncé officiellement son mariage au Grand-Duc Mikhail (Michel) Alexandrovitch, qui après l’abdication de Nicolas II a été considéré par la Famille Impériale comme son nouveau Chef (malgré son refus provisoire de monter sur le trône), et ce dernier, aussi marié morganatiquement (depuis le 1911), lui a fait ses compliments. La Grande-Duchesse Marie Pavlovna, divorcée princesse Guillaume de Suède, en septembre de la même année, se maria avec le Prince Serge Poutyatine. En juillet 1918 le Prince André Alexandrovitch se maria en Crimée, avec Élisabeth Ruffo di Calabria, fille d’un duc italien (mais marié avec une Russe, princesse Mestcherski).
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by David_Pritchard »

David_Pritchard

  • Guest
Re: Succession Laws
« Reply #10 on: March 06, 2006, 08:18:20 PM »
Les Romanoff et leurs mariages après 1917

par Stanislaw Dumin, A.I.G. (Russie, Moscou)

II


Les autres mariages des Romanoff ont été contractés en émigration. Le Grand-Duc Boris Wladimirovitch se maria en Italie en 1919 avec une petite noble russe Zinaïde Rachevska (deux fois mariée et divorcée ; son deuxième mari était un marchand), et son frère André en 1921 en France (avec la permission de son frère aîné Cyrille, nouveau Chef de la MIR) à une ballerine Mathilde Kchessinska. Le Grand-Duc Dimitri Pavlovitch, en 1926, s’est marié avec une Américaine, Audry Emery (il a aussi reçu la permission du Chef de la MIR). Le Grand-Duc Alexandre Mikhaïlovitch a pensé à un nouveau mariage avec une étrangère, mais son épouse, la Grande-Duchesse Xénia Alexandrovna, n’a pas accepté le divorce. Contrairement à ces mariages des Grands-Ducs, ceux des jeunes Princes de sang en émigration en 1920-1930 ont été, d’habitude, assez aristocratiques. Parmi ces épouse : la Comtesse Cheremetieff (Prince Roman Petrovitch), la Princesse Paley, c’est-à-dire la fille du Grand-Duc Paul Alexandrovitch (Prince Theodor Alexandrovitch), la Comtesse Worontsoff-Dachkoff (Prince Nikita Alexandrovitch), Comtesse Golenistchev-Koutouzoff (Prince Dimitri Alexandrovitch), Princesses Golitsine (Princes Rostislav et Vassili Alexandrovitch), lady Mary Lygon, fille du Comte Beauchamp, lord anglais (Prince Vsevolod. Ioannovitch). Les Princesses de sang en majorité contractent des mariages avec des aristocrates russes (princes Golitsine, Orloff, Tchavtchavadze) ou étrangers (marquis Farace di Villafresta) ; et les premières exceptions viennent en 1921 avec le mariage de la Princesse Xenia Guéorguievna avec un Américain (William B. Lids) et celui de la Princesse Tatiana Constantinovna, veuve du prince Constantin Bagration-Moukhranski (de Moukhrani), avec le colonel russe Aleksandre Korotchentsov.

Dans les années 30 et après la deuxième guerre mondiale beaucoup de Romanoff ont divorcé. Leurs remariages seront encore moins prestigieux ; les nouvelles épouses des Princes sont d’habitude de simples Américaines, Australiennes, Anglaises etc., n’appartenant pas à la noblesse (et de même sont les mariages de la grande majorité de leurs descendants morganatiques dans les générations suivantes).

Le décret de l’empereur Cyrille le 28.07.1935 a établi que « dans le cas des mariages inégaux, mais légaux [c’est-à-dire ; autorisés par le Chef de la Maison] des Membres de la Famille Impériale, leurs femmes et leurs enfants ainsi que leur descendance reçoivent le titre et le nom des princes Romanovski, avec l’adjonction du nom de jeune fille de l’épouse de ce Membre de la Famille Impériale ou un autre nom de famille concédé par le Chef de la Maison Impériale de Russie, avec le prédicat d’Altesse Sérénissime pour l’épouse et pour l’aîné dans cette famille ». En vertu de ce décret ainsi que des autres actes des Chefs de la MIR en exil, « Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels » donnent aux descendants directs, mais morganatiques, de la dynastie le titre des princes Romanovski, avec l’adjonction des noms qui leur sont accordés. Ils sont cités dans la 3e partie du volume « princier » (Fürstlische Häuser), parmi les autres princes n’appartenant pas aux maisons dynastiques (tandis que les Romanoff-Holstein-Gottorpe sont présentés dans la première partie du même volume, ainsi que les autres maisons régnantes ou ex-régnantes). Mais il faut aussi signaler, que dans quelques cas leur droit pour ce titre n’est pas clair. Pour profiter de cette possibilité il serait nécessaire d’obtenir la permission individuelle du Chef de la MIR, tandis que les enfants des Romanoff issus de mariages non autorisés par le Chef de la MIR, du point de vue dynastique sont des bâtards.

Beaucoup de Romanoff s’adressent à Cyrille et à son fils Wladimir pour obtenir leur permission et d’habitude, des titres pour leurs épouses. Nous sont connus par exemple les concessions des titres pour l’épouse et le fils du Grand-Duc André Wladimirovitch (les Princes Romanovski-Krassinski, Altesses Sérénissimes), pour la femme du Grand-Duc Dimitri Pavlovitch et à leur descendance (princes Romanovski-Ilyinski, Altesses Sérénissimes), pour la première épouse du Prince Dimitri Alexandrovitch et pour sa fille (Princesses Romanovski-Koutouzoff, Altesses Sérénissimes), à la première épouse du Prince (le Grand-Duc depuis 1939) Gavriil Constantinovitch (Princesse Romanovskaya-Strelninskaya, Altesse Sérénissime), pour la première et la troisième épouses du Prince Wsewolod Ioannovitch (Princesses Romanovskaya-Pavlovskaya et Romanovskaya-Knust, Altesses Sérénissimes) et pour le fils du Grand-Duc Nicolas Constantinovitch (prince Iskander). Mais les titres des « Princes Romanff » ou même des « Princes de Russie », donnés dans les publications de J. Ferrand, de J.-M. Thiébaud et dans quelques autres éditions à toutes ces personnes issues de mariages morganatiques des Romanoff; c’est-à-dire que ceux qui n’appartiennent pas à la MIR, n’ont aucune valeur juridique et ne sont pas conformes au « Statut de la Famille Impériale ».

Parmi tous les Romanoff qui se trouvent en émigration après 1917, c’est seulement dans la branche de l’empereur en exil Cyrille que ses enfants et sa petite-fille ont continué la tradition des mariages dynastiques : la Grande-Duchesse Marie Kirillovna est mariée en 1925 avec S.A. le Prince Charle de Leiningen, plus tard 6e Prince-chef de cette maison médiatisée, et sa sœur Kira en 1938 épouse S.A.I.R. le Prince Luis-Ferdinand, futur chef de la Maison Impériale d’Allemagne et de la Maison Royale de Prusse. Leur frère ; le Grand-Duc Wladimir Kirillovitch, le chef de la MIR (en 1938-1992) est marié en 1948 avec S.A.R. la Princesse Léonida Bagration de Moukhrani, dont le père et le frère ont été les chefs de la Famille Royale et les prétendants légitimes au trône de Géorgie, et dont la famille a déjà été alliée aux Bourbons d’Espagne et aux Wittelsbachs de Bavière. Leur fille, la Grande-Duchesse Marie Wladimirovna, qui est le chef actuel de la MIR (depuis 1992), a été mariée en 1978 avec S.A.I.R. le prince François-Guillaume de Prusse ; devenu orthodoxe, il a reçu le titre de Grand-Duc et le nom de Mikhail Pavlovitch. En vertu des « Lois fondamentales », leur contrat de mariage de 1978, et des traditions des dynasties européennes, au fils unique de la Grande-Duchesse Marie et à son héritier le Grand-Duc George (Gueorgiï) Mikhaïlovitch (né en 1981) et à sa future descendance appartient le nom dynastique des Romanoff.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by David_Pritchard »

Offline LisaDavidson

  • Moderator
  • Velikye Knyaz
  • *****
  • Posts: 2665
    • View Profile
Re: Succession Laws
« Reply #11 on: March 07, 2006, 12:49:22 AM »
Quote
David, I suspect that you are a lawyer or of the legal turn of mind, for you clearly remember fine points of laws which are over a century old and were rendered obsolete by the revolution.  Even the most ardent fans of this site couldn't recall everything they'd read. And some of us are new to the topic, and therefore less well-informed than yourself.

So, if I've understood your correction properly, you say that the succession claims of the Vladimirovichi are valid under the old laws.  Were this the case, it seems that when pushed to make a statement on the matter the Dowager Empress would have supported Kyrill's claim. But she did not, and surely as an anointed empress, her opinion would carry greater weight than anybody's.

I suppose one might answer back that she never truly accepted the deaths of her sons and grandson, but if that were the case, why would she have said that it was the decision of the Russian people as to the next tsar?  

Thank you for providing information.  I hope that the next time you have the privilege of sharing your knowledge, you will be less rude and impatient with the ignorance of others.  After all, we are here to learn, are we not?

Pax, Nadezhda


Nadezhda - I am not David and do not speak for him. However, I do share what I believe is his frustration with having to constantly explain the same information over and over again. Perhaps he could have been more tactful, but I don't believe he's been rude - at the most, I would say he's been curt and certainly frustrated.

Quite simply, none of the historians who are familiar with the Fundamental Law question the Vladimirovichi claim to the throne. It's absolutely a dead issue that has been debated ad naseum literally for decades. The only people who raise these issues by citing the FL are those unfamiliar with the fact that it's already been thoroughly examined.

There are, however, many who believe that the Fundamental Law is no longer valid. Certainly Michael Alexandrovich was one of these, and his mother, the Dowager Empress, another. Michael clearly articulated his position in his manifesto, which has been mischaracterized as an abdication. Michael's position basically was as his mother restated it, i.e., the Russian people should have a say in determining any future plans for a monarchy.

The Nicholievich branch and now the Mikhailovich branch continue to support this manifesto, as did the Dowager Empress.

David is correct, however, in stating that the Dowager Empress' opinion had no legal standing under the laws of the Russian Empire.

Offline ukupeeter

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 52
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
    • View Profile
Re: Succession Laws
« Reply #12 on: March 12, 2006, 03:45:27 AM »
Quote
If you were to send me your e-mail address in a PM, I can send you a copy of the 1906 Fundemental Law in a word document. From you name, I assume that you are Russian, the document is in Russian.

While the Dowager Empress had preceedence among women in Russia, the moment of the death of Emperor Mikhail II, Grand Duke Kyril became the Head of the Imperial House by law. The opinions of the Dowager Empress should they have been positive or negative were of no actual legal relevance, though a good word toward Grand Duke Kyril would certainly have been appreciated for family solidarity.

David



Yes but I know that Kyril was very strange man:) and not very clever man...
And he don`t understand: he took about Russian  Imperial House , but not a Holstein-Gottorp House.

Kyrils action against Romanovs was foolish behavior and I think with serious Chekaa  influence.

Offline LisaDavidson

  • Moderator
  • Velikye Knyaz
  • *****
  • Posts: 2665
    • View Profile
Re: Succession Laws
« Reply #13 on: March 12, 2006, 12:21:29 PM »
Quote


Yes but I know that Kyril was very strange man:) and not very clever man...
And he don`t understand: he took about Russian  Imperial House , but not a Holstein-Gottorp House.

Kyrils action against Romanovs was foolish behavior and I think with serious Chekaa  influence.


I am really unclear what your point is here. To restate what you said, I believe you say that Kyril was strange, not clever, didn't understand what house he belonged to, looked foolish, and was possibly an agent of the Bolshevik Secret Police. Did I get that right?

What in heaven's name does this have to do with the Fundamental Law? I get that you don't approve of KV, but none of the things you mention have any relevance to his position as Head of the House after the deaths of Nicholas, Alexis, and Michael. None.

Oh, and the Cheka? The Bolsheviks came into power the year AFTER KV and Family left Russia. Next time you want to sling mud, kindly check your facts first.

Offline ukupeeter

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 52
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
    • View Profile
Re: Succession Laws
« Reply #14 on: March 12, 2006, 01:49:23 PM »
 

"hat in heaven's name does this have to do with the Fundamental Law? "

You are so naive ::)
Kiryll took about Fundamental Law connect with non-equal marriage only early 1930.

His action against Romanovs was foolish behavior.


"Oh, and the Cheka? "

<unproven comment deleted pending substantiation>
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by LisaDavidson »