Author Topic: Treaty of Greenwich  (Read 3563 times)

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Offline Prince_Lieven

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Treaty of Greenwich
« on: October 21, 2006, 12:52:54 PM »
Does anyone know the exact provisions of the Treaty of Greenwich, signed between England and Scotland? I know it provided for the future marriage between Mary Queen of Scots and Prince Edward, and that Mary would go to England aged 10 for the marriage. Did the treaty have any other clauses? Did it say that Edward would be King of Scots after the marriage? Would Henry have been Regent of Scotland?
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bell_the_cat

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Re: Treaty of Greenwich
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2006, 05:43:33 PM »
I'm just guessing, but I don't think anyone knew what the exact terms of the treaty were - each side had it's own version and the truth was lost somewhere between London and Edinburgh. In any case the treaty was torn up about six months later. I imagine the English version of it had Edward as King of Scots and Henry as Regent!

Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: Treaty of Greenwich
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2006, 07:08:25 AM »
That's a pretty shrewd assessment Bell - I can't think what the Scots thought they would actually gain by signing it!
"How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?"
-Sherlock Holmes

"Men forget, but never forgive; women forgive, but never forget."

bell_the_cat

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Re: Treaty of Greenwich
« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2006, 04:53:14 PM »
In fact they had nothing to gain, but two factors should be considered. Firstly the Scottish army had been recently destroyed at Solway Firth, so Henry could have invaded Scotland if he had wished. Secondly there was a power struggle over the regency. Th Earl of Arran used the treaty to confer a kind of legitimacy over his regime, in opposition to French interests represented by th Queen Mother.

Once he was established, six months after the treaty the situation was very different. Henry was planning a new 
campaign in France and halfheartedly sent raiding expeditions into Scotland, alienating the population, so that Arran felt able to tear up the treaty,