Author Topic: King George V  (Read 42135 times)

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Offline TimM

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Re: King George V
« Reply #30 on: November 17, 2011, 02:52:59 AM »
Were he and Nicky separated at birth?    ;D
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Offline DNAgenie

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Re: King George V
« Reply #31 on: November 17, 2011, 05:20:14 PM »
The picture of Teen George shows quite clealry that he had a cleft chin! 

That's interesting, as he's the only one of Queen Victoria's descendants that I have found to have this characteristic. QV's father the Duke of Kent had it, but I hadn't seen it in any other descendants so assumed that she hadn't inherited the gene or genes that control this trait.  Now it looks as though she did.

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Re: King George V
« Reply #32 on: November 17, 2011, 05:38:05 PM »
I know there was once a thread on George because I posted on it but I can't seem to find it--even using the search feature! If anyone finds it, point me to it and I'll merge the 2. In the meantime, here's a replacement one.

George (on tour) laughing at the photographers



and at crew antics



Seems he has a big  sense of humor.  =)

Offline Carolath Habsburg

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Re: King George V
« Reply #33 on: November 18, 2011, 06:02:04 AM »
Funny that the illustration of this postcard has been labeled as "nicholas II" in some places



 

Courtesy of Grand Duchess Ally

"...Пусть он землю бережет родную, А любовь Катюша сбережет....". Grand Duchess Ekaterina Fyodorovna to Grand Duke Georgiy Alexandrovich. 1914

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Offline Carolath Habsburg

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Re: King George V
« Reply #34 on: October 25, 2012, 07:57:34 AM »
The kings´s first christmas broadcast at sandringham. 1934



 
« Last Edit: November 04, 2012, 06:55:52 PM by Alixz »

Courtesy of Grand Duchess Ally

"...Пусть он землю бережет родную, А любовь Катюша сбережет....". Grand Duchess Ekaterina Fyodorovna to Grand Duke Georgiy Alexandrovich. 1914

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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: King George V
« Reply #35 on: October 25, 2012, 09:18:23 PM »
The King's Christmas speech to go with the photo above:

http://www.britishpathe.com/video/his-majesties-speech-to-his-peoples/query/george+v+speech

King George V's Christmas Speech. He thanks the people for celebrations to mark his 25th silver jubilee, he sends Christmas wishes from Royal Family to all his subjects.

Sound only version of of speech / broadcast made by King George V at the end of the celebrations of his Silver Jubilee.

http://www.britishpathe.com/video/king-george-v-jubilee-speech-aka-george-5th

Fascinating to hear his voice for such an extended clip--almost 7 minutes. The King didn't have much longer to live by the time he gave either speech, only about a month in the case of the latter.
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Offline Carolath Habsburg

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Re: King George V
« Reply #36 on: October 26, 2012, 07:48:14 AM »
Amazing! its great to know that the voice i imagined for him was exactly like his real one. Thanks so much GdE!!

Courtesy of Grand Duchess Ally

"...Пусть он землю бережет родную, А любовь Катюша сбережет....". Grand Duchess Ekaterina Fyodorovna to Grand Duke Georgiy Alexandrovich. 1914

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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: King George V
« Reply #37 on: October 26, 2012, 02:42:11 PM »
No problem. If you search the Pathe site, they have quite a few speeches by his but these seemed the most substantial. I always pictured his voice a little heartier, based on some descriptions, but that could've lessned with his age and ill-health (especially relating to his lungs). He was pretty weak but the time he gave these speeches. It was said, back in 1932 when he gave his first Christmas speech, that he had the perfect voice for the task--just the way his people would want him to sound. He was reluctant to do it given his natural reticence & dislike of change but went along. It was such a success that it's inconceivable now to image the monarch doing away with the tradition. He did his speeches live, from Sandringham.

From royal.gov.uk:

"The Christmas message was started by The Queen's grandfather, King George V. King George had reigned since 1910, but it was not until 1932 that he delivered his first Christmas message. The original idea for a Christmas speech by the Sovereign was mooted in 1932 by Sir John Reith, the visionary founding father of the BBC, to inaugurate the Empire Service (now the BBC World Service). Originally hesitant about using the relatively untried medium of radio in this way, The King was reassured by a visit to the BBC in the summer of 1932, and agreed to take part. And so, on Christmas Day, 1932, King George V spoke on the 'wireless' to the Empire from a small office at Sandringham. The transmission was an exercise of contemporary logistic brilliance. Two rooms at Sandringham were converted into temporary broadcasting rooms. The microphones at Sandringham were connected through Post Office land lines to the Control Room at Broadcasting House. From there connection was made to BBC transmitters in the Home Service, and to the Empire Broadcasting Station at Daventry with its six short-wave transmitters.

The General Post Office was used to reach Australia, Canada, India, Kenya and South Africa. The time chosen was 3.00pm - the best time for reaching most of the countries in the Empire by short waves from the transmitters in Britain. In the event, the first Broadcast started at five past three (twenty-five minutes to four according to the King's 'Sandringham Time') and lasted two and a half minutes. The Broadcast was preceded by an hour-long programme of greetings from all parts of the Empire. The text of the first Christmas speech was written by poet and writer Rudyard Kipling and began with the words: "I speak now from my home and from my heart to you all."

The King acknowledged the unifying force of technology in his historic speech: "I speak now from my home and from my heart to you all; to men and women so cut off by the snows, the desert, or the sea, that only voices out of the air can reach them." As the sound of a global family sharing common interests, the Broadcast made a huge impact on its audience of 20 million. Equally impressed, George V made a Broadcast every Christmas Day subsequently until his death in 1936. George V's last Christmas Broadcast in 1935 came less than a month before his death and the King's voice sounded weaker. He spoke of his people's joys and sorrows, as well as his own, and there was a special word for his children."

Transcript of his first Christmas broadast, written by his good friend Rudyard Kipling:
 
Through one of the marvels of modern Science, I am enabled, this Christmas Day, to speak to all my peoples throughout the Empire. I take it as a good omen that Wireless should have reached its present perfection at a time when the Empire has been linked in closer union. For it offers us immense possibilities to make that union closer still. It may be that our future may lay upon us more than one stern test. Our past will have taught us how to meet it unshaken. For the present, the work to which we are all equally bound is to arrive at a reasoned tranquillity within our borders; to regain prosperity without self-seeking; and to carry with us those whom the burden of past years has disheartened or overborne. My life's aim has been to serve as I might, towards those ends. Your loyalty, your confidence in me has been my abundant reward. I speak now from my home and from my heart to you all. To men and women so cut off by the snows, the desert or the sea, that only voices out of the air can reach them; to those cut off from fuller life by blindness, sickness, or infirmity; and to those who are celebrating this day with their children and grand-children. To all - to each - I wish a Happy Christmas. God Bless You!.

Here's an audio link: http://www.mixcloud.com/radioposterity/king-george-v-christmas-speech-1932/

 
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Offline carl fraley

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Re: King George V
« Reply #38 on: November 04, 2012, 03:43:28 AM »
IMO HM THE QUEEN favors HM Queen Mary, but if you look at the pic of HM the King above giving his first speech, anyone else think that HM the Queen has her grandfathers Eyes?

Offline grandduchessella

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Re: King George V
« Reply #39 on: March 20, 2013, 03:13:28 PM »
One of the reasons I have a soft spot for George V is his absolute horror at the wanton slaughter of WW1, expressed in many letters and in the remembrances of others. I came across this book the other day. It was a record of the pilgrimage he and Queen Mary undertook after the end of the war to the many British and Colonial graves in France and Belgium.

In the inscription he writes:

BUCKINGHAM PALACE

May 1922.

I am interested to hear of the proposed publication of the record of my pilgrimage to the War Graves.

It grieves me to think how many relatives are prevented from visiting the graves of their dear ones through lack of means. During my recent visit to the Cemeteries in France and Belgium, I was glad to learn that various organisations are endeavouring to meet this difficulty by raising funds which I trust will be substantially assisted by the sale of the book.

And the proceeds did go to many charities devoted to this cause and the cause of the upkeep of the graves.

Some photos and text:

"IT was our King’s wish that he should go as a private pilgrim, with no trappings of state nor pomp of ceremony, and with only a small suite, to visit the tombs in Belgium and France of his comrades who gave up their lives in the Great War. In the uniform which they wore on service, he passed from one to another of the cemeteries which, in their noble simplicity, express perfectly the proud grief of the British race in their dead; and, at the end, within sight of the white cliffs of England, spoke his thoughts in a message of eloquence which moved all his Empire to sympathy.

The Governments of France and of Belgium, our allies in the war for the freedom of the world, respected the King’s wish. Nowhere did official ceremony intrude on an office of private devotion. But nothing could prevent the people of the country-side gathering around the places which the King visited, bringing with them flowers, and joining their tribute to his. They acclaimed him not so much as King, but rather as the head of those khaki columns which crossed the Channel to help to guard their homes; in their minds the memory of the glad relief of August, 1914, when they learnt that the British were with them in the war and felt that the ultimate end was secure. Many of them were of the peasants who, before the scattered graves of our dead had been gathered into enduring cemeteries, had graced them with flowers, making vases of[Pg 5] shell-cases gathered from the battle-fields. The King was deeply moved by their presence, at seeing them leave for an hour the task of building up their ruined homes and shattered farms, and coming with pious gratitude to share his homage to the men who had been faithful to their trust unto death. To those around him he spoke more than once in thankful appreciation of this good feeling of the people of France and Belgium. Especially was he pleased to see the children of the country-side crowd around him, and when little choirs of them sang “God Save the King” in quaintly accented words his feeling was manifest.

There came thus to the pilgrimage from the first an atmosphere of affectionate intimacy between these people who were not his subjects and the British King. They gathered around him as around a friend, the old women leaning forward to catch his words, the children trying to come close enough to touch him, seeing in his uniform again the “Tommy” who had proved such a gentle soul when he came for a brief rest from the horrors of the battle-field to the villages behind the line and helped “mother” with the housework and nursed the baby. At one village a gendarme, feeling in his official soul that this was really no way to treat a King, tried to arrange some more formal atmosphere. But in vain. The villagers saw the old friendly good-humoured British Army back in France, and could not be official."

AT BRANDHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY.




TYNE COT CEMETERY/THE KING AND THE GARDENERS





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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: King George V
« Reply #40 on: March 20, 2013, 03:16:02 PM »
"Now and then at a cemetery the King met relatives, in some cases from far-off Pacific Dominions, visiting their dead, and he stopped to speak with them because they were on the same mission as he was, of gratitude and reverence. One mother, moved by the kindness of the King’s greeting, opened her heart to him and told, with the simple eloquence of real feeling,[Pg 6] how she had just come from her son’s grave and was proud that he had died for his King and country; that every care had been taken to find and identify it, and “more could not have been done if it had been the Prince of Wales himself.”

At several points the workers of the Imperial War Graves Commission—practically all of whom had gone through the campaign, and now are reverently and carefully tending the last resting-places of their fallen comrades—assembled to greet the King. He spoke with them also, giving them thanks for their work and noting their war medals and asking them about their life in the camps, or with the mobile caravans which, in the districts where housing cannot yet be found, move from cemetery to cemetery, keeping fresh the tribute of grass and flowers and trees—caravans which bring back vividly one’s memory of the old British supply columns, for they are almost invariably led by a small self-important and well-fed dog.

When at Vlamertinghe—where are the graves of the first Dominion soldiers who fell in the war—the High Commissioner for Canada, the Hon. P. C. Larkin, was met visiting the Canadian graves there; the King gave him a very warm greeting. He showed that there is never absent from his mind the thought that in the greatest Ordeal of Battle which the British race has had to pass through, the children nations of his Empire came to the side of the Mother Country, with the instinctive spontaneity of the blood in a limb responding to a message from the heart; and that the crimson tie of kinship never broke nor slackened through all the perilous anxious years. Across the sea, held for them as a safe path by the Navy, the men of the Empire—and the women, too—kept passing at the King’s word to whatsoever point at which the peril was greatest, the work most exacting. The graves of[Pg 7] the Flanders battle-fields told triumphantly of this august Imperial assembly—the dead of the Mother Country having around them those of India, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Newfoundland, the West Indies, the Pacific Islands.[1] At every point the voices of the dead bespoke, in the King’s words, “the single-hearted assembly of nations and races which form our Empire.”

VLAMERTINGHE MILITARY CEMETERY





CROUY BRITISH CEMETERY/THE KING TALKING TO TWO BEREAVED AUSTRALIAN RELATIVES


They also serve who only stand and wait--John Milton
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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: King George V
« Reply #41 on: March 20, 2013, 03:19:05 PM »
"There were other battles of Ypres, and all the land around was saturated with the blood of heroes. So this “low and hollow ground,” stiffened with our dead, is holy soil to the British race. The King chose fitly to render there his homage to the dead of the Belgian Army who on the Yser held the left flank of the line through all the years of bitter fighting for Ypres.

On his way to the Menin Gate of Ypres city, the King directed the cars to turn aside to the Town Cemetery, that he might stand silent for a few moments by the graves of Prince Maurice of Battenberg, Lord Charles Mercer-Nairne, Major the Hon. W. Cadogan, and other officers, some of those of his own personal friends whom the war claimed, and whose graves lie among those of their men, marked by the same simple memorials.

GRAVE OF H.H. PRINCE MAURICE OF BATTENBERG



MENIN GATE, YPRES/EXAMINING THE PLANS FOR THE MEMORIAL TO THOSE WHO HAVE NO KNOWN GRAVE



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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: King George V
« Reply #42 on: March 20, 2013, 03:20:52 PM »
ETAPLES

THE KING READING THE LETTER FROM A BEREAVED MOTHER ASKING THE QUEEN TO PLACE A BUNCH OF FORGET-ME-NOTS ON HER SON’S GRAVE



tHE KING PLACING THE FORGET-ME-NOTS ON THE GRAVE



MEERUT INDIAN CEMETERY/INSPECTING INDIAN GRAVES



TERLINCTHUN/THE SILENCE AND THE SALUTE AT THE CROSS

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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: King George V
« Reply #43 on: March 20, 2013, 03:22:11 PM »


“In the course of my pilgrimage I have many times asked myself whether there can be more potent advocates of peace upon earth through the years to come than this massed multitude of silent witnesses to the desolation of war”

Much more information on the entire trip and dozens more photos:

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/36075/36075-h/36075-h.htm
They also serve who only stand and wait--John Milton
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Offline TimM

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Re: King George V
« Reply #44 on: March 23, 2013, 04:17:09 PM »
I always felt a little sorry for George V in his later years.  He saw the world he knew wiped out by the First World War, replaced by a new, alien Europe he didn't know.  He must have felt like a lost astronaut who's returned to Earth in the wrong century.
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