Author Topic: Portraits of the Romanovs - XVIII- middle XIX cent.  (Read 45952 times)

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Offline gogm

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Re: Portraits of the Romanovs - XVIII- middle XIX cent.
« Reply #60 on: October 03, 2009, 03:40:33 PM »
Portraits of Sophie of Anhalt-Zerbst are interesting to look at.

Offline CountessKate

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Re: Portraits of the Romanovs - XVIII- middle XIX cent.
« Reply #61 on: October 05, 2009, 05:55:54 AM »
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Portraits of Sophie of Anhalt-Zerbst are interesting to look at.

Presumably they are very rare - as a minor German princess, only one or two would have been done to send to foreign courts to encourage marriage prospects.  The powdered hair and corseted figure makes her look much older than 13.

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Re: Portraits of the Romanovs - XVIII- middle XIX cent.
« Reply #62 on: November 04, 2009, 11:46:51 AM »
Peter the great, a pity, I can't say the exact year and who was the author...also what the allegorical figure could represent?, power, justice?, or it could be a representation of Russia?...Mother Russia...


Offline Alexandrina-Sofia

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Re: Portraits of the Romanovs - XVIII- middle XIX cent.
« Reply #63 on: December 06, 2009, 06:51:19 AM »
Portrait of Tsarina Praskovya Feodorovna Saltykova , wife of Ivan V.



Portraits of Tsarevna Catherine Ioannovna





Portraits of Tsarevna Praskovya Ioannovna



« Last Edit: December 06, 2009, 07:04:11 AM by Alexandrina-Sofia »

Offline Marc

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Re: Portraits of the Romanovs - XVIII- middle XIX cent.
« Reply #64 on: December 06, 2009, 06:12:07 PM »
Nice and new one of Catherine Ioanovna..thank you!

Offline Alexandrina-Sofia

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Re: Portraits of the Romanovs - XVIII- middle XIX cent.
« Reply #65 on: December 07, 2009, 07:23:36 AM »
Please. This is a portrait of Louis Caravaque, the first quarter of XVIII century.

Offline Alexandrina-Sofia

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Re: Portraits of the Romanovs - XVIII- middle XIX cent.
« Reply #66 on: December 15, 2009, 09:09:35 AM »
Portraits of Emperor Ioann VI Antonovich.









Ioann VI Antonovich and Anna Leopoldovna. Unknoun artist. 1741.



Portrait of Emperor Ioann VI Antonovich with parents.



Portrait of Emperor Ioann Antonovich child with a maid of honor, Juliana von Mengden. Unknown artist, the second quarter of the XVIII century.



Offline Svetabel

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Re: Portraits of the Romanovs - XVIII- middle XIX cent.
« Reply #67 on: December 15, 2009, 09:13:26 AM »

Portrait of Emperor Ioann Antonovich child with a maid of honor, Juliana von Mengden. Unknown artist, the second quarter of the XVIII century.

http://www.rulex.ru/rpg/WebPict/fullpic/0097-218.jpg


In a little girl's dress? I am doubt that's him. Of course those times the children of different sex were dressed alike but in the case with Ioann, the Emperor, I don't think he was painted as a little girl in decolletage and elaborated hair-do.

Offline CountessKate

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Re: Portraits of the Romanovs - XVIII- middle XIX cent.
« Reply #68 on: December 15, 2009, 11:05:51 AM »
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In a little girl's dress? I am doubt that's him. Of course those times the children of different sex were dressed alike but in the case with Ioann, the Emperor, I don't think he was painted as a little girl in decolletage and elaborated hair-do.

On the contrary, it was universal amongst the upper and middle classes from very early times to dress little boys in skirts until aged 5-7, right until the early 20th century.  The great-grandson of Louis XIV was shown in just such an outfit in this portrait by Largilliere: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nicolas_de_Largilli%C3%A8re_003.jpg
and there are numerous other examples in existence.  Boys' dress tended to be differentiated from girls' by wearing braid and plain linen rather than lace and Ioann's costume follows this trend.  Although it is clearly a less formal portrait he is holding a whip or other accessory in a manner which emulates a soldier's baton, or sword hilt, conforming to standard royal images.  Louis XIV as another child king was portrayed in skirts until he was 'breeched', i.e. put in adult male clothing: http://www.louis-xiv.de/index.php?id=65

Offline Alexandrina-Sofia

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Re: Portraits of the Romanovs - XVIII- middle XIX cent.
« Reply #69 on: December 15, 2009, 10:44:42 PM »



Portrait of Emperor Ioann VI Antonovich with parents.



« Last Edit: December 15, 2009, 11:52:05 PM by Svetabel »

Offline Svetabel

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Re: Portraits of the Romanovs - XVIII- middle XIX cent.
« Reply #70 on: December 15, 2009, 11:57:06 PM »
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In a little girl's dress? I am doubt that's him. Of course those times the children of different sex were dressed alike but in the case with Ioann, the Emperor, I don't think he was painted as a little girl in decolletage and elaborated hair-do.

On the contrary, it was universal amongst the upper and middle classes from very early times to dress little boys in skirts until aged 5-7, right until the early 20th century.  The great-grandson of Louis XIV was shown in just such an outfit in this portrait by Largilliere: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nicolas_de_Largilli%C3%A8re_003.jpg
and there are numerous other examples in existence.  Boys' dress tended to be differentiated from girls' by wearing braid and plain linen rather than lace and Ioann's costume follows this trend.  Although it is clearly a less formal portrait he is holding a whip or other accessory in a manner which emulates a soldier's baton, or sword hilt, conforming to standard royal images.  Louis XIV as another child king was portrayed in skirts until he was 'breeched', i.e. put in adult male clothing: http://www.louis-xiv.de/index.php?id=65



I understand all this, and know about the Louis' portaits. I just don't figure how could that be in Russia in spite of its tendency then to Europe-ish  behaviour...Need to seacrh for some more example of such Russian portraits.

Offline CountessKate

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Re: Portraits of the Romanovs - XVIII- middle XIX cent.
« Reply #71 on: December 16, 2009, 04:10:26 AM »
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I understand all this, and know about the Louis' portaits. I just don't figure how could that be in Russia in spite of its tendency then to Europe-ish  behaviour...Need to seacrh for some more example of such Russian portraits.

As portraits of the royal family from Peter the Great onwards clearly demonstrate, western dress and standard western royal allegorical allusions were the norm.  In the portrayals of Ioann VI Antonovich as Emperor he is in a wide variety of clothing, some of which mimic the coronation ritual - plain linen with royal robes, which was very usual in western royal iconography; there is another royal portrait type of a standard western nature where he is in classical roman soldier dress; and the informal portrait with his nurse (?), governess (?) where he is in the western dress for little boys which suggests that this is what he wore normally.  The portraits of his parents are in the normal style of western court dress.  The single portrait which stands out is that where he is dressed in a short red smock, with a cat (?) by his side, with no marks of his imperial rank, which looks genuinely russian rather than western, but as I said that seems the exception rather than the norm.  Tsarina Elizabeth, who ousted him, made a great feature of her russian heritage, was never depicted in royal portraits in anything other than western dress, and I would have said that the main aim of the royal portraits of Anna Leopoldovna's short regency appears to have been to continue what had become by then the normal type of royal portraiture for her son - which was almost overwhelmingly western.  Was there a particular reason why you think Ioann VI Antonovich would have been dressed or portrayed in anything other than the western style which by then was normal for the imperial family?


Offline Svetabel

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Re: Portraits of the Romanovs - XVIII- middle XIX cent.
« Reply #73 on: December 16, 2009, 07:50:58 AM »
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I understand all this, and know about the Louis' portaits. I just don't figure how could that be in Russia in spite of its tendency then to Europe-ish  behaviour...Need to seacrh for some more example of such Russian portraits.

 In the portrayals of Ioann VI Antonovich as Emperor he is in a wide variety of clothing, some of which mimic the coronation ritual - plain linen with royal robes, which was very usual in western royal iconography; there is another royal portrait type of a standard western nature where he is in classical roman soldier dress; and the informal portrait with his nurse (?), governess (?) where he is in the western dress for little boys which suggests that this is what he wore normally. 
Was there a particular reason why you think Ioann VI Antonovich would have been dressed or portrayed in anything other than the western style which by then was normal for the imperial family?

Yuliana von Mengden was a close friend of Anna Leopoldovna (there were rumours about lesbian type of their friendship), so POSSIBLY the portrait (if that really portrait of Ioann VI) was not for world-wide demonstration but for a close circle of friends...My particular reason is that I can't recall any other Imperial offspring (a boy of course) of the first part of 18 cent. in such an outfit.

Offline ivanushka

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Re: Portraits of the Romanovs - XVIII- middle XIX cent.
« Reply #74 on: December 20, 2009, 11:07:45 AM »
The portraits of Ivan, his family and Julie Mengden are fascinating.  Thank you so much for posting them.  They're also very sad too when you see this little boy portrayed in this regal setting and know how terribly the rest of his life played out.